Pap smears a must to protect against cervical cancer

October 19, 2012
Pap smears a must to protect against cervical cancer
PhD student Leanne Christie's research has brought to light some common and dangerous misconceptions about how cervical cancer is contracted.

(Medical Xpress)—An alarming number of women don't understand that the common sexually transmitted infection human papillomavirus (HPV) causes cervical cancer, a Queensland University of Technology (QUT) researcher has found.

QUT PhD researcher Leane Christie, from the Faculty of Health, interviewed more than 1200 Queensland women to find out what they knew about preventing cervical cancer.

She said the research brought to light some common and dangerous misconceptions.

"Ninety per cent of women interviewed believed that played a key role in the development of cervical cancer but in reality HPV is by far the most common cause," she said.

"Many women also didn't know that even if they had had one their entire life, they could still contract the infection."

She said there was a need for more education around HPV.

"HPV is as common as it is contagious - it's the common cold of sexual activity and it can cause cervical cancer," she said.

She said regular were essential to prevent cervical cancer and this was the case regardless of whether a woman had received the .

"The vaccine is one of the most significant achievements in modern medical science," Ms Christie said.

"Recent publicity around the National Program (NHPVP), which began in 2007, has improved public awareness of HPV, but the vaccine cannot protect women against all cancer producing HPV strains.

"The HPV vaccine protects women against the two most common and aggressive HPV strains but there are 20 others that can still cause cervical cancer."

Ms Christie said her research found many women did not realise that Pap smears were a powerful tool for prevention and not just for early detection of cancer.

"Regular Pap smears identify any before the cancer develops, enabling steps to be taken to prevent the cancer from forming," she said.

"We know this because since the National Cervical Screening Program was introduced 20 years ago, the rates of new cases and deaths from cervical cancer have more than halved," Ms Christie said.

"It is also clear that the majority (82 per cent) of women who get have not had regular Pap smears or have never been screened."

Ms Christie said current recommendations were for women to have a Pap smear every two years, starting from the age of 20 (if sexually active) until they reached the age of 70.

"I hope this research helps reduce the stigma around HPV being a sexually transmitted infection and promotes more women to have regular Pap smears," she said.

Explore further: Lack of clarity about HPV vaccine and the need for cervical cancer screening

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The research will be presented today at the Annual Scientific Meeting of the Society of Academic Primary Care, hosted this year by the Academic Unit of Primary Health Care, University of Bristol.

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Lantern5
1 / 5 (1) Oct 19, 2012
Instead of the usual test is very embarrassing that it would be better to design a device shaped glass cylinder filled inside with micro cameras and sensors, so ultrasound (emitters and sensors protrude from the edge lines of holes) even could design two apparatus: one internal glass microchambers, and the other a rubber cilindrode ultrasound sensors and sensors inside hardness. In both cases the patient follow the recorded instructions by a nurse on a computer and the patient herself would examination, thus avoiding the embarrassment of being touched by a stranger, in many cases, not all physicians have an ethical adequate in these respects.
If tomamaos note that all relatives have for women, we must understand the urgency of creating a self-exam.
Lantern5
1 / 5 (1) Oct 19, 2012
Other translation of the previous idea:
Instead of the usual test is very awkward, two devices would be better to design self-test: A tube-shaped glass cylinder filled with various kinds of sensors and microcameras inside. The other device would be a cylinder made of rubber. That cylinder would have holes through which small asomarían ultrasound emission devices that would create a highly detailed image of the inside of the vagina. In both cases the patient will follow the instructions of a computer, which recorded the data obtained appliances. This system will avoid the shame of having been touched by a extraño.En many cases, not all doctors are ethical enough in these respects.
Considering that we all have women in our families, we must understand the urgency of creating a self-examination.

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