Report explores health care reform and U.S. election

November 1, 2012
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As part of a collaboration between Yale and the London School of Economics (LSE), Zack Cooper, assistant professor of health policy and economics at Yale, has distilled the complexities of U.S. health care reform into a report designed to be accessible to a general audience.

The brief—which was prepared as a joint effort of Yale's Institute of Social and Policy Studies and LSE's Centre for Economic Performance—serves as a guide to people all over the world who are interested in the unique challenges of the system and how they affect the presidential election.

"The U.S. will have an enormous impact on what happens to the country's public finances and the economy more general," notes Romesh Vaitilingam, a spokesman for the LSE center. "So we thought [it would] be useful for policymakers, media commentators, and a broader public audience to have a succinct overview of how U.S. health care works and what are the big issues up for debate. … [W]e wanted to provide a little background and research evidence at a time when world's gaze is keenly focused on the outcome of this presidential election. "

Explore further: Analysis finds likely voters rank health care second most important issue in presidential choice

More information: cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/cepusa003.pdf

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