Scoliosis surgery improves adolescents' quality of life

November 2, 2012
Scoliosis surgery improves adolescents' quality of life
Surgical treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis significantly improves quality of life, according to research published online Oct. 22 in the Journal of Spinal Disorders & Techniques.

(HealthDay)—Surgical treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) significantly improves quality of life (QOL), according to research published online Oct. 22 in the Journal of Spinal Disorders & Techniques.

Luciano Antonio Nassar Pellegrino, M.D., and Osmar Avanzi, M.D., Ph.D., of Santa Casa de São Paulo in Brazil, prospectively evaluated the QOL of 33 patients with AIS before and three, six, and 12 months after surgery using the Research Society-30 (SRS-30) and Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36) questionnaires. Results were also evaluated according to Cobb angle, curve correction, or type of instrumentation used (hybrid or pedicle screws alone).

The researchers found that, overall, the greatest changes occurred in the self-image and satisfaction with management domains of the SRS-30 questionnaire. Although QOL scores showed that pain was worse and function was decreased at the three-month visit, by 12 months, both scores were significantly improved from baseline (preoperative). By six and 12 months, total scores on the SRS-30 survey were significantly improved, and significant improvements were also noted in general health, vitality, and social functioning using the SF-36 survey. The improvements were independent of curve magnitude, the percent curve correction, or type of instrumentation used in the surgical procedure.

"Surgical treatment of AIS, whether using hybrid instrumentation or pedicle screws alone, can not only provide adequate correction of spinal deformity but also lead to significant improvements in health-related , as shown by improvement in all SRS-30 and SF-36 domain scores," the authors write.

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