Single topical ivermectin head lice treatment very effective

November 2, 2012
Single topical ivermectin head lice treatment very effective
A single 10-minute, at-home treatment with topical ivermectin lotion eliminates head lice infestations in nearly all patients by the next day, according to a study published in the Nov. 1 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

(HealthDay)—A single 10-minute, at-home treatment with topical ivermectin lotion eliminates head lice infestations in nearly all patients by the next day, according to a study published in the Nov. 1 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

David M. Pariser, M.D., from the Eastern Virginia Medical School in Norfolk, and colleagues randomly assigned 765 patients with head lice (6 months of age or older) to a single application of 0.5 percent lotion or vehicle control without nit combing.

The researchers found that a significantly greater percentage of the ivermectin group was free of lice on day two (94.9 versus 31.3 percent), day eight (85.2 versus 20.8 percent), and day 15 (73.8 versus 17.6 percent). Both groups had similar frequency and severity of adverse events.

"In conclusion, ivermectin has a well-established safety profile, on the basis of extensive oral use, and a novel mode of action," Pariser and colleagues conclude. "Topical ivermectin showed high efficacy within 24 hours, with most treated patients remaining louse-free through the final assessment two weeks after a single treatment, without the need for nit combing."

The study was funded by Topaz Pharmaceuticals (now Sanofi Pasteur), which provided the study medication; two authors disclosed to Topaz Pharmaceuticals and .

Explore further: Head lice beginning to show permethrin resistance

More information: Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Head lice beginning to show permethrin resistance

June 5, 2012
(HealthDay) -- Although live head lice obtained from school-aged children in Paris remain susceptible to the insecticide malathion, approximately 14 percent have been found to be resistant to permethrin, suggesting a strong ...

Sequential oral, topical tacrolimus benefits dermatitis

September 20, 2012
(HealthDay)—Sequential therapy with oral tacrolimus and topical tacrolimus may be an effective treatment for severe atopic dermatitis (AD), according to a pilot study published in the October issue of the Journal of the ...

New study: Cheap, common drug could dramatically reduce malaria transmission in Africa

July 6, 2011
A cheap, common heartworm medication that is already being used to fight other parasites in Africa could also dramatically interrupt transmission of malaria, potentially providing an inexpensive tool to fight a disease that ...

R-CHOP benefits older mantle-cell lymphoma patients

August 9, 2012
(HealthDay) -- In older patients with mantle-cell lymphoma, a rituximab-based chemotherapy regimen (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone [R-CHOP]) followed by maintenance therapy with rituximab ...

Recommended for you

Pickled in 'cognac', Chopin's heart gives up its secrets

November 26, 2017
The heart of Frederic Chopin, among the world's most cherished musical virtuosos, may finally have given up the cause of his untimely death.

Sugar industry withheld evidence of sucrose's health effects nearly 50 years ago

November 21, 2017
A U.S. sugar industry trade group appears to have pulled the plug on a study that was producing animal evidence linking sucrose to disease nearly 50 years ago, researchers argue in a paper publishing on November 21 in the ...

Female researchers pay more attention to sex and gender in medicine

November 7, 2017
When women participate in a medical research paper, that research is more likely to take into account the differences between the way men and women react to diseases and treatments, according to a new study by Stanford researchers.

Drug therapy from lethal bacteria could reduce kidney transplant rejection

August 3, 2017
An experimental treatment derived from a potentially deadly microorganism may provide lifesaving help for kidney transplant patients, according to an international study led by investigators at Cedars-Sinai.

Exploring the potential of human echolocation

June 25, 2017
People who are visually impaired will often use a cane to feel out their surroundings. With training and practice, people can learn to use the pitch, loudness and timbre of echoes from the cane or other sounds to navigate ...

Team eradicates hepatitis C in 10 patients following lifesaving transplants from infected donors

April 30, 2017
Ten patients at Penn Medicine have been cured of the Hepatitis C virus (HCV) following lifesaving kidney transplants from deceased donors who were infected with the disease. The findings point to new strategies for increasing ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.