Global collaborative efforts help delineate pediatric traumatic brain injury causes, characteristics and trends in China

December 14, 2012, Nationwide Children's Hospital

Traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) among children in China are a growing public health concern. Two new studies by researchers of the International Program at the Center for Injury Research and Policy of The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital and the Wuhan Children's Hospital in China examined pediatric TBIs that were treated at Wuhan Children's Hospital from 2002 to 2011.

The first study, appearing in the December 2012 print issue of PLOS ONE, investigated the causes, characteristics and trends of pediatric TBIs in and found that falls, struck by/against objects and were the top external causes of TBI. The study also found that approximately six percent of all TBIs among children under two years of age were caused by suspected . This is the first study to highlight the important role of suspected child abuse in causing TBIs among infants in China and has led to the second study appearing in the November 2012 issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, which examined abuse-related TBIs among children in China. These two publications are not only the first steps in understanding the causes of among children in China but a way to highlight the success of global collaborations in injury research. 

Since its in 2004, the International Program at the Center for Injury Research and Policy has established several international collaborations, including the one with Wuhan Children's Hospital, and has worked to decrease the burden of injury morbidity and mortality worldwide. "The successful collaboration with Wuhan Children's Hospital is a testament to their leaders' dedication and commitment to promoting academic excellence and innovation in clinical care," said Huiyun Xiang, MD, MPH, PhD  and Director for International Programs at the Center for Research and Policy. " brings many challenges, as well as great opportunities, and we are excited about our collaboration with Wuhan Children's Hospital," said Dr. Xiang, also an Associate Professor of the Division of Epidemiology at The Ohio State University College of Public Health. 

"In the past five years, a total of seven physicians from Wuhan Children's Hospital received clinical training at Nationwide Children's Hospital. These physicians have become a driving force for innovative care and academic excellence at Wuhan Children's Hospital," said Jianbo Shao, MD, Vice-President for Research and Training at Wuhan Children's Hospital. "We cherish the relationship with Nationwide Children's and look forward to more collaboration in scientific research and clinical training between the two organizations."

The studies are both available online. "Characteristics and Trends of Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injuries Treated at a Large Pediatric Medical Center in China 2002-2011" is available on the PLOS ONE website by visiting at dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0051634. "Characteristics and Trends of Hospitalized Pediatric Abuse Head Trauma in Wuhan, China: 2002-2011"is available through the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health's website at www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/9/11/4187 .

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