Drug approved for inherited blood disorder

January 24, 2013

(HealthDay)—Exjade (deferasirox) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to remove excess iron in the blood among people with a genetic blood disorder called non-transfusion-dependent thalassemia (NTDT).

Too much iron in the blood can damage vital organs, the agency said Wednesday in a news release.

Thalassemia typically leads to the production of fewer and less hemoglobin, a protein that carries oxygen throughout the body. NTDT is a milder form of thalassemia that unlike other forms, does not require frequent blood transfusions. Thalassemia affects about 1,000 people in the United States, the FDA said.

The FDA previously approved Exjade to treat chronic iron overload among people who require blood transfusions.

The drug is produced by Novartis, East Hanover, N.J.

Explore further: Blood protein offers help against anemia

More information: The U.S. National Heart Lung and Blood Institute has more about thalassemia.

More Information

Related Stories

Blood protein offers help against anemia

January 26, 2010
A new study shows that a protein found in blood alleviates anemia, a condition in which the body's tissues don't get enough oxygen from the blood. In this animal study, injections of the protein, known as transferrin, also ...

Gene variant linked to moderated symptoms of beta-thalassemia

January 30, 2008
Beta-thalassemia is a serious, potentially life-threatening disease that affects red blood cells, cells that carry oxygen via hemoglobin throughout the body. As part of the SardiNIA Study of Aging, supported by the National ...

Omontys approved for anemic people with kidney disease

March 27, 2012
(HealthDay) -- Omontys (peginesatide) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat anemia in adults who require dialysis due to chronic kidney disease.

Engineered version of HIV is used to cure genetic blood disorder

September 16, 2010
For the second time, researchers have used the HIV virus in gene therapy to cure a severe genetic disease, this time the blood disorder beta-thalassemia, which causes life-threatening anemia.

MIT uncovers key blood protein

October 11, 2007
Scientists working in the only lab at MIT doing hematology research have uncovered a protein that plays a key role in the recycling of iron from blood.

Researchers find new genetic target for sickle cell disease therapy

December 4, 2008
Researchers have identified a gene that directly affects the production of a form of hemoglobin that is instrumental in modifying the severity of the inherited blood disorders sickle cell disease and thalassemia. The discovery ...

Recommended for you

Rapid response inpatient education boosts use of needed blood-thinning drugs

November 16, 2018
A new study designed to reach hospitalized patients at risk shows that a "real-time" educational conversation, video or leaflet can lower the missed dose rates of drugs that can prevent potentially lethal blood clots in their ...

Drug overdose epidemic goes far beyond opioids, requires new policies

November 7, 2018
Most government-funded initiatives to address the overdose epidemic in the United States have targeted opioids specifically and have neglected other drugs that are increasingly implicated in overdoses, such as cocaine and ...

Zebrafish larvae help in search for appetite suppressants

November 2, 2018
Researchers at the University of Zurich and Harvard University have developed a new strategy in the search for psychoactive drugs. By analyzing the behavior of larval zebrafish, they can filter out substances with unwanted ...

FDA OKs powerful opioid pill as alternative to IV painkiller

November 2, 2018
U.S. regulators on Friday approved a fast-acting, super-potent opioid tablet as an alternative to IV painkillers used in hospitals.

Amphetamine-related hospitalizations surged between 2003 and 2015

November 2, 2018
An analysis conducted by Hennepin Healthcare, University of Minnesota School of Public Health and University of Michigan researchers shows amphetamine-related hospitalizations increased more than 270 percent from 2008 to ...

Cocaine-fentanyl overdoses underscore need for more 'test strips' and rapid response

November 1, 2018
Penn Medicine emergency department physicians are calling for more readily available testing strips to identify the presence of fentanyl in patients experiencing a drug overdose, and a rapid, coordinated response among health ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.