High-dose flu vaccine better protects HIV-infected adults

January 4, 2013
High-dose flu vaccine better protects HIV-infected adults
HIV-infected adults achieve higher rates of seroprotection when immunized with a high-dose of the influenza trivalent vaccine compared to the standard dose, according to a study published in the Jan. 1 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

(HealthDay)—HIV-infected adults achieve higher rates of seroprotection when immunized with a high-dose of the influenza trivalent vaccine compared to the standard dose, according to a study published in the Jan. 1 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Noah McKittrick, M.D., from University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, and colleagues randomly assigned 190 HIV-infected persons (older than 18 years) to receive either a standard dose (15 mcg of antigen per strain; 93 participants) or a high dose (60 mcg/strain; 97 participants) of the influenza trivalent vaccine. The rate of seroprotection was assessed, defined as antibody titers of 1:40 or greater on the hemagglutination inhibition assay 21 to 28 days after vaccination. Seroconversion, defined as a greater than four-fold increase in antibody titers, and the geometric mean antibody titer were also assessed.

The researchers found that, in the high-dose group, seroprotection rates were higher for H1N1 (96 versus 87 percent; P = 0.029), H3N2 (96 versus 92 percent; P = 0.32), and (91 versus 80 percent; P = 0.030) strains. Both standard- and high-dose vaccines were well tolerated, with the most frequent being myalgia (19 percent), malaise (14 percent), and local pain (10 percent).

"The implications of this research are important for future vaccination efforts in the HIV-positive population," the authors write. "This study suggests that a substantial number of HIV-infected patients may not be obtaining sufficient protection with the standard ."

Explore further: Third MMR vaccine dose can curtail mumps outbreak

More information: Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Third MMR vaccine dose can curtail mumps outbreak

November 5, 2012
(HealthDay)—Administering a third dose of the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine reduced the village-wide attack rate by about 75 percent in a community experiencing a large mumps outbreak despite a high rate of previous ...

Dose-escalated cetuximab tolerated in colorectal cancer

July 5, 2012
(HealthDay) -- For patients with irinotecan-refractory metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC), dose escalation of cetuximab is well tolerated and may improve response and disease control rates, but patients experience more grade ...

Single-dose H1N1 vaccine not reliable protection for pediatric liver-transplant patients

July 26, 2011
Researchers from Australia determined that pediatric liver transplant patients who received a single-dose of the H1N1 vaccine were not adequately protected against the virus compared to healthy children. This study appearing ...

Recommended for you

Scientists divulge latest in HIV prevention

July 25, 2017
A far cry from the 1990s "ABC" campaign promoting abstinence and monogamy as HIV protection, scientists reported on new approaches Tuesday allowing people to have all the safe sex they want.

Girl's HIV infection seems under control without AIDS drugs

July 24, 2017
A South African girl born with the AIDS virus has kept her infection suppressed for more than eight years after stopping anti-HIV medicines—more evidence that early treatment can occasionally cause a long remission that, ...

Meds by monthly injection might revolutionize HIV care (Update)

July 24, 2017
Getting a shot of medication to control HIV every month or two instead of having to take pills every day could transform the way the virus is kept at bay.

Candidate AIDS vaccine passes early test

July 24, 2017
The three-decade-old quest for an AIDS vaccine received a shot of hope Monday when developers announced that a prototype triggered the immune system in an early phase of human trials.

Paris spotlight on latest in AIDS science

July 21, 2017
Some 6,000 HIV experts gather in Paris from Sunday to report advances in AIDS science as fading hopes of finding a cure push research into new fields.

Scientists elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies to HIV in calves

July 20, 2017
Scientists supported by the National Institutes of Health have achieved a significant step forward, eliciting broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) to HIV by immunizing calves. The findings offer insights for HIV vaccine ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.