Guidelines updated for young CA survivors' fertility follow-up

February 5, 2013
Guidelines updated for young CA survivors' fertility follow-up
Current recommendations for the assessment and management of female reproductive complications following treatment of cancers in childhood, adolescence, and young adulthood have been updated, according to a review published online Feb. 4 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

(HealthDay)—Current recommendations for the assessment and management of female reproductive complications following treatment of cancers in childhood, adolescence, and young adulthood have been updated, according to a review published online Feb. 4 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Based on a review of current literature and expert consensus, Monika L. Metzger, M.D., from the St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in Memphis, Tenn., and colleagues on a multidisciplinary panel updated the Children's Oncology Group Long-Term Follow-Up Guidelines for Survivors of Childhood, Adolescent, and Young Adult Cancer (COG-LTFU Guidelines).

The review summarizes current recommendations for the evaluation and management of female reproductive complications following treatment for childhood, adolescent, and young adult cancers. In addition, barriers and ethical considerations for experimental pretreatment and post-treatment fertility preservation strategies, not included in the COG-LTFU Guidelines, are outlined.

"Risk of gonadal, reproductive, and sexual complications in female varies according to cancer type, age at diagnosis, and therapeutic exposure. Oncologists should be aware of potential complications that may affect long-term reproductive and sexual health and discuss them in a developmentally appropriate way with patients and families before treatment," the authors write. "It is important to review potential risks after completion of therapy and during long-term follow-up and to plan ongoing surveillance measures."

Explore further: Health woes persist for young cancer survivors: study

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