Study: Tobacco control lowers CA health care costs

February 13, 2013 by Garance Burke

(AP)—A new study says California's tobacco prevention program saved $134 billion in health care costs over the last two decades.

The study published Wednesday in the science journal found that for every dollar spent on the state's anti-smoking program, dropped by about $56.

University of California, San Francisco researchers attribute those savings to lower spending on health care due to people quitting or not starting, and those who do light up consuming fewer cigarettes each day.

California spent about $2.4 billion from 1989 through 2008 on one of the nation's most aggressive .

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is talking with the authors to see how their methodology may be integrated with other efforts to highlight the economic costs of smoking, as well as the potential cost savings of prevention programs.

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Sean_W
1 / 5 (1) Feb 13, 2013
Let me guess. They counted any "smoking related" illness decrease as money saved but neglected to add extra geriatric costs from people living into the time of life when you use more healthcare.

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