Pain conditions linked to increased risk of suicide

May 27, 2013
Pain conditions linked to increased risk of suicide
Certain non-cancer pain conditions, including back pain, migraine, and psychogenic pain, are associated with increased risk of suicide in patients using Veterans Health Administration services, according to research published online May 22 in JAMA Psychiatry.

(HealthDay)—Certain non-cancer pain conditions, including back pain, migraine, and psychogenic pain, are associated with increased risk of suicide in patients using Veterans Health Administration (VHA) services, according to research published online May 22 in JAMA Psychiatry.

Mark A. Ilgen, Ph.D., of the Veterans Affairs Serious Mental Illness Treatment Resource and Evaluation Center in Ann Arbor, Mich., and colleagues performed a retrospective analysis of data from the National Death Index and treatment records from the Department of Veterans Affairs Healthcare System to evaluate associations between clinical diagnoses of certain non-cancer conditions and suicide. The study population included all individuals receiving VHA services during the 2005 fiscal year who remained alive at the beginning of the 2006 fiscal year (4,863,086 participants). The pain conditions that were examined were arthritis, back pain, neuropathic pain, headache or tension headache, migraine headache, fibromyalgia, and psychogenic pain. The observation period for suicide death was fiscal years 2006 to 2008.

The researchers found elevated suicide risks for each pain-related condition, except arthritis and neuropathy, after adjusting for age, sex, and score on the Charlson Comorbidity Index. After additional adjustment for concomitant , psychogenic pain (hazard ratio [HR], 1.58), migraine (HR, 1.34), and back pain (HR, 1.13) continued to be associated with increased risk for .

"There is a need for increased awareness of in individuals with certain non-cancer pain diagnoses, in particular back pain, migraine, and psychogenic pain," Ilgen and colleagues conclude.

Explore further: New mobile app helps migraine sufferers track and analyze pain

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

New mobile app helps migraine sufferers track and analyze pain

November 5, 2012
A new iPhone app developed at the University of Michigan lets migraine or facial pain patients easily track and record their pain, which in turn helps the treating clinician develop a pain management plan.

Hologram-like 3-D brain helps researchers decode migraine pain (w/ Video)

April 19, 2013
(Medical Xpress)—Wielding a joystick and wearing special glasses, pain researcher Alexandre DaSilva rotates and slices apart a large, colorful, 3-D brain floating in space before him.

Study shows COPD is associated with significant and persistent pain

May 21, 2013
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is primarily associated with the respiratory symptoms that are its hallmark, but in fact, patients who struggle with the disease also experience significant amounts of chronic ...

Many suffer chronic pain after breast cancer surgery, study finds

January 22, 2013
(HealthDay)—About one-quarter of women who've had breast cancer surgery have significant and persistent breast pain six months after the procedure, a new study finds.

What is the mental pain?

April 4, 2013
When we think of pain we generally think of something that is related to our body. But there is a devastating form of pain that is not frequently acknowledged and is a topic of a paper by Eliana Tossani (University of Bologna) ...

Little evidence for prediction rules for low back pain

May 17, 2013
(HealthDay)—Few randomized clinical trials have been done to assess clinical prediction rules for patients with lower back pain, and the trials that have been done are of low quality and do not provide sufficient evidence ...

Recommended for you

Inflamed support cells appear to contribute to some kinds of autism

October 18, 2017
Modeling the interplay between neurons and astrocytes derived from children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, with colleagues in Brazil, say innate ...

Study suggests psychedelic drugs could reduce criminal behavior

October 18, 2017
Classic psychedelics such as psilocybin (often called magic mushrooms), LSD and mescaline (found in peyote) are associated with a decreased likelihood of antisocial criminal behavior, according to new research from investigators ...

Taking probiotics may reduce postnatal depression

October 18, 2017
Researchers from the University of Auckland and Otago have found evidence that a probiotic given in pregnancy can help prevent or treat symptoms of postnatal depression and anxiety.

Before assigning responsibility, our minds simulate alternative outcomes, study shows

October 17, 2017
How do people assign a cause to events they witness? Some philosophers have suggested that people determine responsibility for a particular outcome by imagining what would have happened if a suspected cause had not intervened.

Schizophrenia disrupts the brain's entire communication system, researchers say

October 17, 2017
Some 40 years since CT scans first revealed abnormalities in the brains of schizophrenia patients, international scientists say the disorder is a systemic disruption to the brain's entire communication system.

For older adults, volunteering could improve brain function

October 17, 2017
Older adults worried about losing their cognitive functions could consider volunteering as a potential boost, according to a University of Missouri researcher. While volunteering and its associations with physical health ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.