The anti-obesity effect of wheat polyphenols

July 1, 2013
Figure 1: Activity rhythm improvement effect and anti-obesity effect of wheat polyphenols.

Researchers from the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), have discovered that wheat polyphenols have effects that improve the rhythm of activity and suppress obesity and glucose intolerance in model mice of diet-induced obesity, in collaboration with Nisshin Seifun Group Inc.

The present study revealed that wheat polyphenols contained in the outer layers of wheat suppress the disruption of activity rhythm and in model mice of -induced obesity, and exhibit a marked anti-obesity effect on the model mice. The consumption of whole-wheat flour, which contains polyphenols, is expected to possibly prevent metabolic disorders such as diabetes, obesity, and the metabolic syndrome.

The results were presented at the 67th Annual Meeting of the Japan Society of Nutrition and Food Science held on May 24 to 26, 2013, at Nagoya University (Nagoya, Aichi Pref.).

It has been pointed out that society's recent shift toward "24 hours a day" and irregular may affect a circadian clock and increase not only , such as and depression, but also lifestyle-related diseases, such as obesity, diabetes, and the . In particular, the increase in associated with the expansion of the Western diet can not only trigger directly, but can also exacerbate such disorders secondarily by causing a nocturnal shift in a person's activity. However, there are presently no drugs that fundamentally cure the disruption of a circadian clock, and the development of a method utilizing the functionality of food to improve circadian rhythm is expected.

AIST aims to uncover the mechanism of the onset of diseases due to the disruption of a circadian clock and to develop methods of preventing and ameliorating diseases by the active control of circadian rhythm. In recent years, the various functionalities of polyphenols have gained attention. Since 2011, AIST has been collaborating with Nisshin Seifun Group Inc. and Oriental Yeast to study novel functionalities of wheat polyphenols contained in whole-wheat flour and wheat bran, dietary ingredients that can be consumed on a regular basis.

The anti-obesity effect of wheat polyphenols
Figure 2: Suppression effect of wheat polyphenols on glucose tolerance decline.

The is affected by the timing of eating and the content of the diet. Studies on mice and other rodents have reported that a high-fat diet causes a nocturnal shift in the time period of activity. In this study, the researchers used model mice of diet-induced obesity that exhibited a nocturnal shift in activity as well as glucose intolerance and obesity in order to evaluate the functionality of wheat polyphenols.

The mice were divided into three groups: a normal diet group, a high-fat, high-sucrose diet group, and a group with a high-fat, high-sucrose diet containing 0.4% wheat polyphenols. The mice were reared over a period of 10 weeks, and the rhythm of activity and body weight were measured and compared. Also, when the test was completed, glucose tolerance was assessed through glucose loading tests, and in addition, liver tissue samples were collected, and lipid accumulation was investigated.

The mouse is a nocturnal animal. The peak in their activity normally occurs in the first half of the dark period, but the peak of activity in mice that consumed a high-fat, high-sucrose diet shifted toward the latter half of the dark period after 10 weeks, demonstrating a nocturnal shift in the rhythm of activity (Fig. 1). Meanwhile, the mice that consumed a high-fat, high-sucrose diet that included wheat polyphenols did not exhibit a nocturnal shift in the rhythm of activity, showing that wheat polyphenols have an effect that improves the rhythm of activity.

The anti-obesity effect of wheat polyphenols
Figure 3: Suppression effect of wheat polyphenols on fatty liver.

In addition, the changes in body weight of the mice that consumed a high-fat, high-sucrose diet containing wheat polyphenols were almost the same as the body weight changes of the mice that consumed a normal diet, which demonstrates that wheat polyphenols suppress weight gain caused by a high-fat, high-sucrose diet (Fig. 1).

Glucose tolerance tests to investigate the effect of wheat polyphenols on glucose metabolic function in mice showed that the decline in glucose tolerance that occurred over 10 weeks due to a high-fat, high-sucrose diet had been suppressed by the simultaneous consumption of wheat polyphenols (Fig. 2). Also, after comparing the accumulation of fat in the liver, it was clear that the simultaneous intake of wheat polyphenols suppressed fat accumulation caused by a high-fat, high-sucrose diet (Fig. 3).

The results demonstrate a novel functionality of wheat polyphenols contained in the outer layers of wheat. In the future, the researcher intends to continue to conduct collaborative research with Nisshin Seifun Group Inc. and Oriental Yeast in order to uncover the molecular mechanisms of the effects that have in improving the rhythm of activity and suppressing obesity.

Explore further: Food contaminants worsen metabolic problems in obese mice

Related Stories

Food contaminants worsen metabolic problems in obese mice

June 27, 2013
(Medical Xpress)—In order to get a better understanding of these effects, researchers from the Inserm cardiovascular, metabolism, diabetology and nutrition unit (U1060 " Laboratoire de recherche en cardiovasculaire, métabolisme, ...

Obesity leads to brain inflammation, and low testosterone makes it worse

June 17, 2013
Low testosterone worsens the harmful effects of obesity in the nervous system, a new study in mice finds. The results will be presented Monday at The Endocrine Society's 95th Annual Meeting in San Francisco.

Molasses extract decreases obesity caused by a high-fat diet

July 12, 2011
Experimental results to be presented at the upcoming annual meeting of the Society for the Study of Ingestive Behavior (SSIB), the foremost society for research into all aspects of eating and drinking behavior, suggests that ...

Circadian clock linked to obesity, diabetes and heart attacks

February 21, 2013
Disruption in the body's circadian rhythm can lead not only to obesity, but can also increase the risk of diabetes and heart disease.

Carefully scheduled high-fat diet resets metabolism and prevents obesity

September 12, 2012
(Medical Xpress)—New research from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem shows that a carefully scheduled high-fat diet can lead to a reduction in body weight and a unique metabolism in which ingested fats are not stored, ...

Recommended for you

Team finds link between backup immune defense, mutation seen in Crohn's disease

July 27, 2017
Genes that regulate a cellular recycling system called autophagy are commonly mutated in Crohn's disease patients, though the link between biological housekeeping and inflammatory bowel disease remained a mystery. Now, researchers ...

Study finds harmful protein on acid triggers a life-threatening disease

July 27, 2017
Using an array of modern biochemical and structural biology techniques, researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) have begun to unravel the mystery of how acidity influences a small protein called serum ...

CRISPR sheds light on rare pediatric bone marrow failure syndrome

July 27, 2017
Using the gene editing technology CRISPR, scientists have shed light on a rare, sometimes fatal syndrome that causes children to gradually lose the ability to manufacture vital blood cells.

Post-stroke patients reach terra firma with new exosuit technology

July 26, 2017
Upright walking on two legs is a defining trait in humans, enabling them to move very efficiently throughout their environment. This can all change in the blink of an eye when a stroke occurs. In about 80% of patients post-stroke, ...

Molecular hitchhiker on human protein signals tumors to self-destruct

July 24, 2017
Powerful molecules can hitch rides on a plentiful human protein and signal tumors to self-destruct, a team of Vanderbilt University engineers found.

Researchers develop new method to generate human antibodies

July 24, 2017
An international team of scientists has developed a method to rapidly produce specific human antibodies in the laboratory. The technique, which will be described in a paper to be published July 24 in The Journal of Experimental ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.