Australian doctors bring woman back from the dead

August 19, 2013

An Australian woman has lived to tell the tale after being brought back to life from being clinically dead for 42 minutes, doctors said on Monday.

Mother-of-two Vanessa Tanasio, 41, was rushed to Monash Medical Centre in Melbourne last week after a major heart attack, with one of her main arteries fully blocked.

She went into and was declared clinically dead soon after arrival.

Doctors refused to give up and used a called a Lucas 2—the only one of its kind in Australia—to keep blood flowing to her brain while Wally Ahmar opened an artery to unblock it.

Once unblocked, Tanasio's heart was shocked back into a normal rhythm.

"(I used) multiple shocks, multiple medications just to resuscitate her," Ahmar said.

"Indeed this is a miracle. I did not expect her to be so well."

Tanasio said she had no history of and was grateful to be alive.

"I remember being on my couch, then the floor, then arriving at hospital, and then two days go missing," Tanasio said.

"I was dead for nearly an hour and only a week later I feel great. It's surreal."

The Lucas device physically compresses the chest, like during cardiopulmonary (CPR), allowing doctors to work non-stop to put a stent into a blocked artery.

It is the first a time a patient has successfully used the device, which was donated to the medical centre, for such a length of time in Australia, the hospital said.

Clinical death is a medical term for when someone stops breathing and their blood stops circulating.

Explore further: Waking the dead? Some things you should know about dying

Related Stories

Waking the dead? Some things you should know about dying

August 9, 2013
Not content with saving lives, doctors are now credited with (accused of?) bringing the dead back to life. But how true are the stories we hear about people "coming back" from being dead and how does it work?

Henry Ford Hospital pioneers new cardiac approach

August 13, 2013
Doctors at Henry Ford Hospital have created a new route to the heart to implant an artificial heart valve by temporarily connecting major blood vessels that do not normally intersect.

Eliminating mouth-to-mouth boosts CPR results, study shows

December 10, 2012
(HealthDayNews)—Bystander CPR saves more lives when just chest compression is performed without mouth-to-mouth resuscitation, a new study from Japan shows.

Elderly benefit from using implantable defibrillators

June 17, 2013
The elderly may benefit from implantable cardioverter defibrillators as much as younger people, according to new research in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

DNA particles in the blood may help speed detection of coronary artery disease

July 1, 2013
DNA fragments in your blood may someday help doctors quickly learn if chest pain means you have narrowed heart arteries, according to a new study published in the American Heart Association journal Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, ...

Mayo Clinic CPR efforts successful on man with no pulse for 96 minutes

May 2, 2011
By all counts, the 54-year-old man who collapsed on a recent winter night in rural Minnesota would likely have died. He'd suffered a heart attack, and even though he was given continuous CPR and a series of shocks with a ...

Recommended for you

Brain disease seen in most football players in large report

July 25, 2017
Research on 202 former football players found evidence of a brain disease linked to repeated head blows in nearly all of them, from athletes in the National Football League, college and even high school.

Safety of medical devices not often evaluated by sex, age, or race

July 25, 2017
Researchers at Yale and the University of California-San Francisco have found that few medical devices are analyzed to consider the influence of their users' sex, age, or race on safety and effectiveness.

Why you should consider more than looks when choosing a fitness tracker

July 25, 2017
A UNSW study of five popular physical activity monitors, including Fitbit and Jawbone models, has found their accuracy differs with the speed of activity, and where they are worn.

Dog walking could be key to ensuring activity in later life

July 24, 2017
A new study has shown that regularly walking a dog boosts levels of physical activity in older people, especially during the winter.

Alcohol to claim 63,000 lives over next five years, experts warn

July 24, 2017
Alcohol consumption will cause 63,000 deaths in England over the next five years – the equivalent of 35 deaths a day – according to a new report from the University of Sheffield Alcohol Research Group.

Alcohol boosts recall of earlier learning

July 24, 2017
Drinking alcohol improves memory for information learned before the drinking episode began, new research suggests.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.