Fetal tissue-derived stem cells may be ideal source for repairing tissues and organs

August 22, 2013, Cell Transplantation Center of Excellence for Aging and Brain Repair

Multipotent fetal dermal cells (MFDCs) may be an ideal source for cell therapy for repairing damaged tissues and organs. Their performance is superior to that of adult dermal cells, said a research team in Italy that developed a cell isolation technique for MFDCs and subsequently published a study that appears as an early e-publication for the journal Cell Transplantation.

"When compared to adult dermal cells, display several advantages, including a greater cellular yield after isolation, the ability to proliferate longer, and the retention of differentiation potential," said study co-author Dr. C.M. Chinnici of the Fondazie Ri.MED, Regenerative Medicine and Biomedical Technologies Unit in Palermo, Italy. "Cells from fetal dermis have been proven safe and efficacious in the treatment of pediatric burns, but proper characterization of these cells has not yet been provided."

Their research provided a protocol for the isolation and expansion of large numbers of MFDCs that may see future clinical use, said the study authors.

"We generated, propagated and analyzed a proliferating population of cells derived from human fetal dermis taken at 20-22 weeks of gestation," wrote the researchers. "The non-enzymatic isolation technique allows for a spontaneous selection of cells with higher motility and yields a nearly homogeneous ."

The MFDCs, they reported, were "highly proliferative and were successfully expanded with no growth factor additions." They noted that, unlike mensenchymal , which progressively lose their differentiation capacity, the MFDCs "retained their osteogenenic and adipogenic differentiation potential" meaning that their potential impact for is likely to be greater.

"The MFDCs demonstrated their favorable characteristics for a potential large scale production aimed at clinical use," said Dr. Chinnici.

The researchers noted that the most interesting aspect of their study was the finding that can be successfully isolated from small fetal skin biopsies and maintained in culture for long periods with multipotency, stability and low immunogenicity retained, "thus generating large quantities of cells for clinical use."

"Given these results, the future prospect is to translate the concept of MFDCs as cells of therapeutic interest into experimental models of tissue regeneration," they concluded.

Explore further: New protocol developed to decontaminate human fetal tissues used for cell transplantation

More information: Chinnici, C. M.; Amico, G.; Monti, M.; Motta, S.; Casalone, R.; Petri, S. L.; Spada, M.; Gridelli, B.; Conaldi, P. G. Isolation and Characterization of Multipotent Cells from Human Fetal Dermis. Cell Transplant. Appeared or available online: June 13, 2013 www.ingentaconnect.com/content … rints/ct1022chinnici

Related Stories

New protocol developed to decontaminate human fetal tissues used for cell transplantation

July 22, 2013
The use of central nervous system fetal tissues derived from routine elective abortions to provide stem cells for transplantation procedures aimed at restoring damage done by neurodegenerative diseases is an established therapy. ...

Fetal stem cell transplantation favorably impacts radiation-induced cognitive dysfunction

August 22, 2013
Patients receiving cranial irradiation treatment for brain cancer may find the treatment life-saving, but often suffer progressive and debilitating cognitive detriments, including spatial learning and memory deficits. The ...

Tracking nanodiamond-tagged stem cells

August 5, 2013
A method that is used to track the fate of a single stem cell within mouse lung tissue is reported in a study published online this week in Nature Nanotechnology. The method may offer insights into the factors that determine ...

The potential impact of olfactory stem cells as therapy reported

June 5, 2012
A study characterizing the multipotency and transplantation value of olfactory stem cells, as well as the ease in obtaining them, has been published in a recent issue of Cell Transplantation (20:11/12), now freely available ...

Recommended for you

Researchers devise decoy molecule to block pain where it starts

January 16, 2018
For anyone who has accidentally injured themselves, Dr. Zachary Campbell not only sympathizes, he's developing new ways to blunt pain.

Scientists unleash power of genetic data to identify disease risk

January 16, 2018
Massive banks of genetic information are being harnessed to shed new light on modifiable health risks that underlie common diseases.

Blood-vessel-on-a-chip provides insight into new anti-inflammatory drug candidate

January 15, 2018
One of the most important and fraught processes in the human body is inflammation. Inflammatory responses to injury or disease are crucial for recruiting the immune system to help the body heal, but inflammation can also ...

Molecule produced by fat cells reduces obesity and diabetes in mice

January 15, 2018
UC San Francisco researchers have discovered a new biological pathway in fat cells that could explain why some people with obesity are at high risk for metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes. The new findings—demonstrated ...

Obese fat becomes inflamed and scarred, which may make weight loss harder

January 12, 2018
The fat of obese people becomes distressed, scarred and inflamed, which can make weight loss more difficult, research at the University of Exeter has found.

Optimized human peptide found to be an effective antibacterial agent

January 11, 2018
A team of researchers in the Netherlands has developed an effective antibacterial ointment based on an optimized human peptide. In their paper published in the journal Science Translational Medicine, the group describes developing ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.