New imaging technology promising for several types of cancer

August 29, 2013
Researchers from University Hospitals Case Medical Center have published findings that a new form of imaging -- PET/MRI -- is promising for several types of cancer. Credit: University Hospitals Case Medical Center

Researchers from University Hospitals Case Medical Center have published findings that a new form of imaging—PET/MRI—is promising for several types of cancer. In an article titled "PET/MRI: Applications in Clinical Imaging," published in the September issue of Current Radiology Reports, the authors outline their initial clinical experience in diagnosing and staging cancer patients with this novel technology.

Working in collaboration with researchers from Philips Healthcare, the team found that PET/MRI provided added value in the diagnosis, staging and treatment planning of , cervical, uterine, ovarian and pancreatic cancers—as well as in the diagnostic management of pediatric and young adult patients. The researchers examined 145 cancer patients with a double-scanning protocol of PET/CT followed by a PET/MRI performed on the Philips Ingenuity TF PET/MRI system.

"Our preliminary experience with this new diagnostic imaging technology proves that it is promising for oncologic applications," says study lead author Karin Herrmann, MD, radiologist at UH Case Medical Center and Visiting Associate Professor of Radiology at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. "We found the PET/MRI enhanced our ability to detect malignant areas and more accurately and confidently diagnose several types of cancers, potentially providing physicians with the ability to improve treatment planning and better monitoring of the disease."

The PET/MRI is a new hybrid imaging modality which brings together the complementary capabilities of MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) and PET (Positron Emission Tomography) scanning to better visualize both functional and anatomical information and to superimpose this information in a combined digital image. The UH Case Medical Center Seidman Cancer Center is the first cancer hospital in the world to house this technology in a purely clinical setting.

In a new class of diagnostic imaging modalities, the PET/MRI combines the highest anatomic detail as well as bio-chemical and functional information provided by MRI with the metabolic, molecular and physiologic information from PET. The technology fuses the to more precisely pinpoint cancer locations and improve the accuracy of disease staging.

In the study, the authors' detailed account summarizes many aspects of the clinical utility of PET/MRI in more accurate detection of cancer and cancer metastasis, use in decision-making, comparisons of detection accuracy across cancers and distinction of benign from malignant lesions in clinical settings.

The authors also outline the considerations of reduction in overall radiation imaging exposure with PET/MRI versus other imaging technologies. Given the similar performance of PET/MR compared to PET/ CT in some disease entities, there is potential to decrease radiation exposure in replacing the CT component in PET/CT with MRI. This may especially be an issue in pediatric and young adult patients with need for repetitive follow up imaging.

"This hybrid scanner has the potential to improve patient care by increasing understanding of the causes, effects, and development of disease processes to better diagnose cancer and various other diseases," said study author Norbert Avril, MD, nuclear radiologist at UH Case Medical Center and Professor at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. "We are very excited to be among the first to be able to help establish guidelines of how best to use this technology to guide physicians on the value of the PET/MRI in diagnosing and staging various forms of cancer. Our initial experience has shown that it may be a very important cancer-fighting tool."

This research was supported by Philips Healthcare and is part of the Philips Healthcare Global Advanced Imaging Innovation Center, established in 2009 at UH Case Medical Center and Case Western Reserve to bring the latest Philips Healthcare imaging equipment to Cleveland for development, validation of clinical efficacy and product release. The Imaging Center was funded through an initial $5 million from Ohio Third Frontier Commission to Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and a $33.4 million matching commitment from Philips.

The Department of Radiology at UH Case Medical Center and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, and the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Case Western Reserve School of Engineering, have some of the nation's leaders in medical imaging who partner with Philips. The company's global Computed Tomography and Nuclear Medicine headquarters is also in Cleveland.

"The collaboration between our various organizations has created a pipeline to move innovative technologies - such as the PET/MRI - more quickly into patient care," said Pablo Ros, MD, Chairman of the Department of Radiology at UH Case Medical Center and Case Western Reserve School of Medicine. "Through this Center, we have become an international hub for imaging technology and there has been great synergy between our institutions to make great strides through imaging research like this to help patients with as well as heart disease and neurologic conditions."

Explore further: Combination of two imaging techniques allows new insights into brain function

Related Stories

Combination of two imaging techniques allows new insights into brain function

August 26, 2013
The ability to measure brain functions non-invasively is important both for clinical diagnoses and research in Neurology and Psychology. Two main imaging techniques are used: positron emission tomography (PET), which reveals ...

Benefit of PET or PET/CT in oesophageal cancer is not proven

August 28, 2013
The patient-relevant benefit of positron emission tomography (PET) in oesophageal cancer, alone or in combination with computed tomography (CT), is not proven due to a lack of comparative studies. In terms of their diagnostic ...

Combination PET-MRI scanner expands imaging frontiers

February 16, 2012
(Medical Xpress) -- Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine are using a new imaging device that simultaneously performs positron-emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, producing ...

PET/MR effective for imaging recurrent prostate cancer

June 11, 2013
When prostate cancer makes a comeback, it becomes increasingly important to have exceptional imaging available to find all possible regions where cancer has spread to other parts of the body, or metastasized, in order to ...

Hybrid PET and MRI imaging on the horizon

June 6, 2011
Preliminary research presented at SNM's 58th Annual Meeting is breaking new ground for the development of a brand new hybrid molecular imaging system. Simultaneous positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance ...

PET/CT bests gold standard bone marrow biopsy for diagnosis and prognosis of lymphoma patients

August 1, 2013
A more precise method for determining bone marrow involvement in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL)—a key factor in tailoring patient management plans—has been identified by researchers in a study published ...

Recommended for you

Shooting the achilles heel of nervous system cancers

July 20, 2017
Virtually all cancer treatments used today also damage normal cells, causing the toxic side effects associated with cancer treatment. A cooperative research team led by researchers at Dartmouth's Norris Cotton Cancer Center ...

Molecular changes with age in normal breast tissue are linked to cancer-related changes

July 20, 2017
Several known factors are associated with a higher risk of breast cancer including increasing age, being overweight after menopause, alcohol intake, and family history. However, the underlying biologic mechanisms through ...

Immune-cell numbers predict response to combination immunotherapy in melanoma

July 20, 2017
Whether a melanoma patient will better respond to a single immunotherapy drug or two in combination depends on the abundance of certain white blood cells within their tumors, according to a new study conducted by UC San Francisco ...

Discovery could lead to better results for patients undergoing radiation

July 19, 2017
More than half of cancer patients undergo radiotherapy, in which high doses of radiation are aimed at diseased tissue to kill cancer cells. But due to a phenomenon known as radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE), in which ...

Definitive genomic study reveals alterations driving most medulloblastoma brain tumors

July 19, 2017
The most comprehensive analysis yet of medulloblastoma has identified genomic changes responsible for more than 75 percent of the brain tumors, including two new suspected cancer genes that were found exclusively in the least ...

Novel CRISPR-Cas9 screening enables discovery of new targets to aid cancer immunotherapy

July 19, 2017
A novel screening method developed by a team at Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center—using CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing technology to test the function of thousands of tumor genes in mice—has ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.