Cognitive behavioral therapy best for cancer patients with insomnia

January 9, 2014
Cognitive behavioral therapy best for cancer patients with insomnia

(HealthDay)—Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) is the preferred choice over mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) for nonpharmacologic management of insomnia in patients with cancer, according to a study published online Jan. 6 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Sheila N. Garland, Ph.D., from the University of Pennsylvania Health System in Philadelphia, and colleagues conducted a noninferiority trial involving with cancer with who were randomized to receive either MBSR (64 patients) or CBT-I (47 patients). The intervention occurred from September 2008 to March 2011, with assessments taken at baseline, after the program, and after three months of follow-up. The margin for noninferiority was four points on the Insomnia Severity Index.

The researchers found that immediately after the program, MBSR was inferior to CBT-I for improving insomnia severity (P = 0.35), but at follow-up, MBSR demonstrated noninferiority (P = 0.02). At follow-up, in the CBT-I group, sleep diary-measured sleep onset latency was reduced by 22 minutes, compared with 14 minutes in the MBSR group. Both groups experienced similar reductions in wake after sleep onset. Increases in total sleep time were 0.60 hours in the CBT-I group and 0.75 hours for MBSR.

"Although MBSR produced a clinically significant change in and psychological outcomes, CBT-I was associated with rapid and durable improvement and remains the best choice for the nonpharmacologic treatment of insomnia," the authors write.

Explore further: Helping lung cancer patients beat insomnia

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Helping lung cancer patients beat insomnia

December 9, 2013
(Medical Xpress)—It is estimated that anywhere from 50 to 80 percent of persons diagnosed with lung cancer experience severe insomnia that may persist for an average of eight years after the initial diagnosis.

Looking at links between depression and insomnia

February 27, 2012
People with both insomnia and depression who have found anti-depressants ineffective can draw hope from a new study currently recruiting in Melbourne.

'Mindfulness' stress reduction helps breast cancer survivors

March 20, 2012
(HealthDay) -- A mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) program provides significant and lasting improvements in mood, breast- and endocrine-related quality of life, and well-being, according to research published online ...

Recommended for you

Study uncovers potential 'silver bullet' for preventing and treating colon cancer

July 26, 2017
In preclinical experiments, researchers at VCU Massey Cancer Center have uncovered a new way in which colon cancer develops, as well as a potential "silver bullet" for preventing and treating it. The findings may extend to ...

Compound shows promise in treating melanoma

July 26, 2017
While past attempts to treat melanoma failed to meet expectations, an international team of researchers are hopeful that a compound they tested on both mice and on human cells in a petri dish takes a positive step toward ...

Understanding cell segregation mechanisms that help prevent cancer spread

July 26, 2017
Scientists have uncovered how cells are kept in the right place as the body develops, which may shed light on what causes invasive cancer cells to migrate.

Study may explain failure of retinoic acid trials against breast cancer

July 25, 2017
Estrogen-positive breast cancers are often treated with anti-estrogen therapies. But about half of these cancers contain a subpopulation of cells marked by the protein cytokeratin 5 (CK5), which resists treatment—and breast ...

Breaking the genetic resistance of lung cancer and melanoma

July 25, 2017
Researchers from Monash University and the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC, New York) have discovered why some cancers – particularly lung cancer and melanoma – are able to quickly develop deadly resistance ...

Physical activity could combat fatigue, cognitive decline in cancer survivors

July 25, 2017
A new study indicates that cancer patients and survivors have a ready weapon against fatigue and "chemo brain": a brisk walk.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.