Non-ob-gyns deliver about 14 percent of routine prenatal care

March 20, 2014
Non-ob-gyns deliver ~14 percent of routine prenatal care

(HealthDay)—Routine prenatal care is often delivered by non-obstetrics and gynecology (Ob-Gyn) providers, according to a March data brief published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).

Sayeedha G. Uddin, M.D., M.P.H., from the NCHS in Hyattsville, Md., and colleagues quantified the amount of routine prenatal care delivered by non-Ob-Gyn providers among women aged 15 to 54 years, who were seen in physicians' offices, community health centers, and hospital outpatient departments.

The researchers found that, in 2009 to 2010, women saw providers whose specialty was not Ob-Gyn at 14.1 percent of routine prenatal care visits in the United States. The highest percentage of visits that were made to non-Ob-Gyn providers (20.5 percent) was among women aged 15 to 19 years. The percentage of visits to non-Ob-Gyn providers was higher among women with Medicaid and those with no insurance (24.3 and 23.1 percent, respectively), compared to with private insurance (7.3 percent). Women in large suburban areas had a lower percentage of routine prenatal visits to non-Ob-Gyn providers (5.1 percent) compared to those in urban areas or in small towns or suburbs (14.4 and 22.4 percent, respectively).

"Non-Ob-Gyn providers delivered one out of every seven routine visits in the United States in 2009 to 2010," the authors write.

Explore further: Academic ob-gyns challenged to balance demands, desires

More information: More Information

Related Stories

Academic ob-gyns challenged to balance demands, desires

October 19, 2013
(HealthDay)—Academic obstetrician-gynecologists (ob-gyns) face challenges relating to the balance between patient care and academic demands, according to a study published online Oct. 7 in Obstetrics & Gynecology.

OB/GYN screening may help detect heart disease risk

March 26, 2012
Simple screening implemented in obstetrics and gynecology (OB/GYN) clinics may identify previously undetected heart disease risk among women and has the potential to greatly increase education about prevention and treatment ...

Poor coverage of breastfeeding found at first prenatal visit

November 12, 2013
(HealthDay)—Education about breastfeeding at the first prenatal visit typically is infrequent and limited, according to research published online Nov. 6 in Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Half of U.S. counties have no ob-gyn: study

May 8, 2012
(HealthDay) -- Nearly half of the counties in the United States lack a single obstetrician-gynecologist, a situation that may worsen as medical school graduates gravitate toward metropolitan areas, a new study indicates.

Uninsured parents don't take breastfeeding classes, even though breast is best

February 26, 2014
Just 12 percent of parents without insurance coverage take breastfeeding support classes that can offer crucial support and encourage new moms to breastfeed, according to a new University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children's ...

Ob-gyn group lists procedures that may not be needed

March 3, 2013
(HealthDay)—Five tests and procedures that obstetricians/gynecologists and their patients should question the need for are outlined in a list released by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) as ...

Recommended for you

Rise in preterm births linked to clinical intervention

January 18, 2018
Research at the University of Adelaide shows preterm births in South Australia have increased by 40 percent over 28 years and early intervention by medical professionals has resulted in the majority of the increase.

New report calls into question effectiveness of pregnancy anti-nausea drug

January 17, 2018
Previously unpublished information from the clinical trial that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration relied on to approve the most commonly prescribed medicine for nausea in pregnancy indicates the drug is not effective, ...

New study finds 'baby brain' is real, but the cause remains mysterious

January 15, 2018
So-called "baby brain" refers to increased forgetfulness, inattention, and mental "fogginess" reported by four out of five pregnant women. These changes in brain function during pregnancy have long been recognised in midwifery ...

Sleep quality improves with help of incontinence drug

January 12, 2018
A drug used to curtail episodes of urinary incontinence in women also improves quality of sleep, a researcher at the Stanford University School of Medicine reports.

Frozen embryos result in just as many live births in IVF

January 10, 2018
Freezing and subsequent transfer of embryos gives infertile couples just as much of a chance of having a child as using fresh embryos for in vitro fertilization (IVF), research from Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, and Adelaide, ...

Study suggests air pollution breathed in the months before and after conception increases chance of birth defects

January 8, 2018
A team of researchers with the University of Cincinnati and Cincinnati Children's Hospital has found evidence that indicates that pre-and post-pregnant women living in an area with air pollution are at an increased risk of ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.