Non-ob-gyns deliver about 14 percent of routine prenatal care

March 20, 2014
Non-ob-gyns deliver ~14 percent of routine prenatal care

(HealthDay)—Routine prenatal care is often delivered by non-obstetrics and gynecology (Ob-Gyn) providers, according to a March data brief published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).

Sayeedha G. Uddin, M.D., M.P.H., from the NCHS in Hyattsville, Md., and colleagues quantified the amount of routine prenatal care delivered by non-Ob-Gyn providers among women aged 15 to 54 years, who were seen in physicians' offices, community health centers, and hospital outpatient departments.

The researchers found that, in 2009 to 2010, women saw providers whose specialty was not Ob-Gyn at 14.1 percent of routine prenatal care visits in the United States. The highest percentage of visits that were made to non-Ob-Gyn providers (20.5 percent) was among women aged 15 to 19 years. The percentage of visits to non-Ob-Gyn providers was higher among women with Medicaid and those with no insurance (24.3 and 23.1 percent, respectively), compared to with private insurance (7.3 percent). Women in large suburban areas had a lower percentage of routine prenatal visits to non-Ob-Gyn providers (5.1 percent) compared to those in urban areas or in small towns or suburbs (14.4 and 22.4 percent, respectively).

"Non-Ob-Gyn providers delivered one out of every seven routine visits in the United States in 2009 to 2010," the authors write.

Explore further: Academic ob-gyns challenged to balance demands, desires

More information: More Information

Related Stories

Academic ob-gyns challenged to balance demands, desires

October 19, 2013
(HealthDay)—Academic obstetrician-gynecologists (ob-gyns) face challenges relating to the balance between patient care and academic demands, according to a study published online Oct. 7 in Obstetrics & Gynecology.

OB/GYN screening may help detect heart disease risk

March 26, 2012
Simple screening implemented in obstetrics and gynecology (OB/GYN) clinics may identify previously undetected heart disease risk among women and has the potential to greatly increase education about prevention and treatment ...

Poor coverage of breastfeeding found at first prenatal visit

November 12, 2013
(HealthDay)—Education about breastfeeding at the first prenatal visit typically is infrequent and limited, according to research published online Nov. 6 in Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Half of U.S. counties have no ob-gyn: study

May 8, 2012
(HealthDay) -- Nearly half of the counties in the United States lack a single obstetrician-gynecologist, a situation that may worsen as medical school graduates gravitate toward metropolitan areas, a new study indicates.

Uninsured parents don't take breastfeeding classes, even though breast is best

February 26, 2014
Just 12 percent of parents without insurance coverage take breastfeeding support classes that can offer crucial support and encourage new moms to breastfeed, according to a new University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children's ...

Ob-gyn group lists procedures that may not be needed

March 3, 2013
(HealthDay)—Five tests and procedures that obstetricians/gynecologists and their patients should question the need for are outlined in a list released by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) as ...

Recommended for you

Women exposed to smoke while in womb more likely to miscarry

July 13, 2017
Women exposed to cigarette smoke while in their mothers' wombs are more likely to experience miscarriage as adults, according to new research from the University of Aberdeen.

Lack of a hormone in pregnant mice linked to preeclampsia

June 30, 2017
(Medical Xpress)—A team of researchers from Singapore, the Netherlands and Turkey has isolated a hormone in pregnant mice that appears to be associated with preeclampsia—a pregnancy-related condition characterized by ...

Aspirin reduces risk of pre-eclampsia in pregnant women

June 28, 2017
Taking a low-dose aspirin before bed can reduce the risk of pre-eclampsia, which can cause premature birth and, in extreme cases, maternal and foetal death.

The biology of uterine fluid: How it informs the fetus of mom's world

June 22, 2017
A developing fetus bathes in a mixture of cellular secretions and proteins unique to its mother's uterus. Before fertilization, the pH of uterine fluid helps create a conducive environment for sperm migration, and afterward, ...

New clues in puzzle over pre-eclampsia and cholesterol regulation

June 21, 2017
Scientists studying a mystery link between the dangerous pregnancy complication pre-eclampsia and an increased risk of heart disease in later life for both mother and child have uncovered important new clues.

Are maternal hormones different when carrying a boy or a girl?

June 15, 2017
With advances in prenatal testing it's now possible to find out whether a pregnancy will result in a male or female baby as early as eight weeks' gestation.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.