Collaborative depression care beneficial in ob-gyn clinics

May 15, 2014
Collaborative depression care beneficial in ob-gyn clinics

(HealthDay)—An evidence-based collaborative depression care intervention adapted to obstetrics and gynecology clinics improves depressive and functional outcomes compared with usual care, according to a study published online May 6 in Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Jennifer L. Melville, M.D., M.P.H., from the University of Washington School of Medicine in Seattle, and colleagues assessed evidence-based collaborative adapted to and gynecology clinics versus usual care in a two-site randomized controlled trial. Participants included women who met criteria for major depression, dysthymia, or both, and were randomly allocated to receive 12 months of collaborative depression management (102 women) or usual care (103 women). Outcomes were compared at six, 12, and 18 months.

The researchers found that patients in the had greater improvement in at 12 months (P < 0.001) and 18 months (P = 0.004) compared with those in the usual-care group. Over the course of 18 months, the intervention group had improved functioning compared with the usual-care group (P < 0.05). In addition, patients in the intervention group were more likely to have a 50 percent or greater decrease in depressive symptoms at 12 months (relative risk [RR], 1.74); a greater likelihood of four or more specialty mental health visits (six months: RR, 2.70; 12 months: RR, 2.53); an adequate dose of antidepressant (six months: RR, 1.64; 12 months: RR, 1.71); and greater satisfaction with care (six months: RR, 1.70; 12 months: RR, 2.26).

"Collaborative depression care adapted to women's health settings improved depressive and functional outcomes and quality of depression care," the authors write.

One author disclosed receiving royalties from a publishing company.

Explore further: New care approach eases depression among women

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