Learning early in life may help keep brain cells alive

May 27, 2014 by Robin Lally
Learning early in life may help keep brain cells alive
Learning in adolescence may play a role in keeping brain cells alive.

According to a recently published study in Frontiers in Neuroscience, Rutgers behavioral and systems neuroscientist Tracey Shors, who co-authored the study, found that the newborn brain cells in young rats that were successful at learning survived while the same brain cells in animals that didn't master the task died quickly.

"In those that didn't learn, three weeks after the new brain cells were made, nearly one-half of them were no longer there," said Shors, professor in the Department of Psychology and Center for Collaborative Neuroscience at Rutgers. "But in those that learned, it was hard to count. There were so many that were still alive."

The study is important, Shors says, because it suggests that the massive proliferation of new brain cells most likely helps young animals leave the protectiveness of their mothers and face dangers, challenges and opportunities of adulthood.

Scientists have known for years that the neurons in , which are significant but fewer in numbers than during puberty, could be saved with , but they did not know if this would be the case for young rats that produce two to four times more neurons than adult animals.

By examining the hippocampus – a portion of the brain associated with the process of learning – after the rats learned to associate a sound with a motor response, scientists found that the new brain cells injected with dye a few weeks earlier were still alive in those that had learned the task while the cells in those who had failed did not survive.

"It's not that learning makes more cells," says Shors. "It's that the process of learning keeps new cells alive that are already present at the time of the learning experience."

Since the process of producing new brain cells on a is similar in animals, including humans, Shors says ensuring that adolescent children learn at optimal levels is critical.

"What it has shown me, especially as an educator, is how difficult it is to achieve optimal learning for our students. You don't want the material to be too easy to learn and yet still have it too difficult where the student doesn't learn and gives up," Shors says.

So, what does this mean for the 12-year-old adolescent boy or girl?

While scientists can't measure individual in humans, Shors says this study, on the cellular level, provides a look at what is happening in the adolescent brain and provides a window into the amazing ability the brain has to reorganize itself and form new neural connections at such a transformational time in our lives.

"Adolescents are trying to figure out who they are now, who they want to be when they grow up and are at school in a learning environment all day long," says Shors. "The brain has to have a lot of strength to respond to all those experiences."

Explore further: 'Chemo brain': Study finds fog-like condition related to chemotherapy's effect on new brain cells and rhythms

More information: The study is available online: journal.frontiersin.org/Journa … nins.2014.00070/full

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russell_russell
not rated yet May 27, 2014
Again.
You can not prevent learning.
In a stimulus poor or ill suited environment you become a vegetable from the input learned (stored).

If you believe there is an optimal way to acquire capabilities or abilities for a specific task, then you believe the life forms you have in mind have only one sense or way to store input.

Learning from input, consciously or unconsciously. Did you learn the concept of Fourier before you perceived sound? Yes, provided the model is correct.

You do not have to 'save' neurons through use. You have to damage new cells to acquire and express the same expressions neurons that were damaged previously from the same experience.

See below.

http://medicalxpr...ain.html

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