Frequent prior hospitalization may predict stroke readmission

June 22, 2014
Frequent prior hospitalization may predict stroke readmission

(HealthDay)—Frequent prior hospitalization and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) rating at admission may predict 30-day readmission after ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke, according to a study published online June 11 in the American Journal of Medical Quality.

Roy E. Strowd, M.D., from the Wake Forest School of Medicine in Winston-Salem, N.C., and colleagues retrospectively compared 79 cases readmitted to the same hospital within 30 days of acute stroke and 86 frequency-matched controls to identify factors associated with readmission.

The researchers found that readmitted patients were more likely to have > 2 hospitalizations in the year prior (21.5 percent versus 2.3 percent in controls, P < 0.001), , , cancer, , pneumonia, urinary infection, and absence of hyperlipidemia. Admission NIHSS (OR, 1.072 per 1-point increase; P = 0.005), prior hospitalizations (OR, 2.205 per admission; P < 0.001), and absence of hyperlipidemia (OR, 0.444; P = 0.023) were independently associated with readmission in multivariate modeling.

"If validated, these characteristics identify high-risk patients and focus efforts to reduce readmission," the authors write.

Several authors disclose ties to the pharmaceutical industry.

Explore further: Study identifies risk factors for hospital readmissions

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