Race affects opioid selection for cancer pain

July 25, 2014

(HealthDay)—Racial disparities exist in the type of opioid prescribed for cancer pain, according to a study published online July 21 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Salimah H. Meghani, Ph.D., R.N., from the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, and colleagues recruited 182 patients from clinics within a single health system. All participants reported the presence of cancer-related pain plus a prescription for morphine or oxycodone. The abbreviated Modification of Diet in Renal Disease formula was used to estimate kidney function.

The researchers found that the severity of analgesic-related adverse effects was greater for patients with (CKD) who received morphine versus oxycodone (P = 0.010). Compared with white patients, African-American patients had 71 percent lower odds of receiving a prescription of oxycodone (P < 0.001), when controlling for health insurance type. The effect of private insurance was no longer significant on limiting the analysis to patients with CKD, but race remained a significant predictor of the prescribed opioid selection. In the presence of CKD, race was a strong predictor for adverse effect severity, and this association was partially mediated by the type of opioid selection.

"Reducing racial disparities in the type of opioid prescription and understanding mechanisms of disproportionate opioid-related in African-American patients might decrease the clinical disparities in cancer pain outcomes," the authors write.

One author disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical industry.

Explore further: Added corticosteroid deemed ineffective for cancer pain

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Added corticosteroid deemed ineffective for cancer pain

July 16, 2014

(HealthDay)—The addition of methylprednisolone (MP) to opioid therapy does not appear to increase the analgesic effect for cancer pain, according to research published online July 7 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

FDA orders starker warnings on opioid painkillers

September 10, 2013

The Food and Drug Administration is requiring stronger warning labels on prescription painkillers like OxyContin, in the government's latest attempt to reduce overdose deaths caused by the long-acting medications.

Recommended for you

Researchers identify source of opioids' side effects

January 17, 2017

A commercially available drug may help drastically reduce two side effects of opioid painkillers—a growing tolerance and a paradoxical increased sensitivity to pain—without affecting the drugs' ability to reduce pain, ...

CVS generic competitor to EpiPen, sold at a 6th the price

January 12, 2017

CVS is now selling a rival, generic version of Mylan's EpiPen at about a sixth of its price, just months after the maker of the life-saving allergy treatment was eviscerated before Congress because of its soaring cost to ...

Many misuse OTC sleep aids: survey

December 29, 2016

(HealthDay)—People struggling with insomnia often turn to non-prescription sleep remedies that may be habit-forming and are only intended for short-term use, according to a new Consumer Reports survey.

The pill won't kill your sexual desire, researchers say

December 15, 2016

Taking the pill doesn't lower your sexual desire, contrary to popular belief, according to research published in the Journal of Sexual Medicine. The authors of the research, from the University of Kentucky and Indiana University ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.