Obese US firefighters report receiving no weight advice from their health provider

July 11, 2014, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

Obese and overweight firefighters are not receiving weight management advice from their health care providers, according to new research from The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).

National guidelines state that health care professionals (HCPs) should advise patients on the importance of maintaining a healthy . Firefighters have high rates of , and cardiovascular events are the leading cause of line-of-duty deaths in . This study assessed the association of age and body mass index (BMI) with HCP weight recommendations among male firefighters.

Researchers used data on self-reported HCP weight recommendations and measured BMI from a 2011–2012 national sample of male firefighters. HCP recommendations were recorded as no advice, maintain, gain, or lose weight, and BMI was categorized as normal, overweight, class I obese, and class II or III obese. We used multinomial logistic regression to estimate the odds of receiving weight advice by age and BMI categories.

Most firefighters (96 percent) reported visiting an HCP in the past year. Most (69 percent) firefighters and 48 percent of class I to III obese firefighters reported receiving no weight advice. Higher BMI predicted HCP advice to lose weight. Younger firefighters were less likely to receive weight loss than older firefighters, except among those who were class II or III obese.

The study was published today in the Center for Disease Control's journal Preventing Chronic Disease.

Explore further: No sign of 'obesity paradox' in obese patients with stroke

More information: Wilkinson ML, Brown AL, Poston WS, Haddock CK, Jahnke SA, Day RS. Physician Weight Recommendations for Overweight and Obese Firefighters, United States, 2011–2012. Prev Chronic Dis 2014;11:140091. DOI: 10.5888/pcd11.140091

Related Stories

No sign of 'obesity paradox' in obese patients with stroke

June 2, 2014
Researchers found no evidence of an "obesity paradox" (some studies have suggested overweight or obese patients have lower mortality rates than underweight or normal weight patients) in patients with stroke.

Women who gain too much or too little weight during pregnancy at risk for having an overweight child

April 14, 2014
Gaining both too much or too little weight during pregnancy appears to increase the risk of having an overweight or obese child, according to a Kaiser Permanente study published today in the American Journal of Obstetrics ...

Obese patients trust diet advice from overweight physicians more than normal-weight physicians

June 4, 2013
When it comes to taking diet advice from a physician—size matters. This is according to a new study led by a team of researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the Johns Hopkins University School ...

Physician's weight may influence obesity diagnosis and care

January 26, 2012
A patient's body mass index (BMI) may not be the only factor at play when a physician diagnoses a patient as obese. According to a new study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, the diagnosis ...

Carrying extra weight could be healthier for older people

March 25, 2014
(Medical Xpress)—Older people with a BMI (body mass index) in the overweight range live longer, according to the results of a new study.

Overweight pregnant women not getting proper weight-gain advice

December 10, 2012
Overweight women are not receiving proper advice on healthy weight gains or appropriate exercise levels during their pregnancies, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers.

Recommended for you

Obesity intervention needed before pregnancy

December 6, 2018
New research from the University of Adelaide's Robinson Research Institute supports the need for dietary and lifestyle interventions before overweight and obese women become pregnant.

Gene that lets you eat as much as you want holds promise against obesity

December 4, 2018
It sounds too good to be true, but a novel approach that might allow you to eat as much food as you want without gaining weight could be a reality in the near future.

High childhood BMI linked to obesity at age 24 in women

December 3, 2018
Girls who gain weight more rapidly between the ages of 5 and 15 are more likely to be obese at age 24, according to researchers.

Mothers more influential than fathers when it comes to children's weight

November 21, 2018
Overweight and obesity often continue for generations in families. The links can be genetic, but are also related to family relationships and lifestyle habits.

Race plays role in regaining weight after gastric bypass surgery

November 15, 2018
African Americans and Hispanic Americans who have undergone Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) are at greater risk to regain weight as compared to Caucasians. To date, no study has addressed the effect of race on weight regain ...

Simple tips can lead to better food choices

November 13, 2018
A few easily learned tips on eating and food choice can increase amount of healthy food choices between 5 percent and 11 percent, a new Yale University study has found.

2 comments

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

alfie_null
not rated yet Jul 12, 2014
Why do firefighters have higher rates of obesity?

How effective is receiving health care provider advice?
Forestgnome
not rated yet Jul 13, 2014
They don't know they're fat without an expert telling them?

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.