Guidelines issued for managing listeriosis in pregnancy

August 8, 2014
Guidelines issued for managing listeriosis in pregnancy

(HealthDay)—Recommendations have been developed for pregnant women with presumptive exposure to Listeria monocytogenes. These guidelines were published as a Committee Opinion online Aug. 5 in Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Noting that the incidence of is about 13 times higher among than in the general population, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists Committee on Obstetric Practice developed for management of pregnant women with exposure to Listeria monocytogenes.

The researchers note that maternal infection may present as a nonspecific flu-like illness, with symptoms such as fever, myalgia, backache, and headache, which may be preceded by gastrointestinal symptoms, including diarrhea. Fetal and neonatal infections can be severe, resulting in fetal loss and preterm labor as well as neonatal sepsis, meningitis, and death. An exposed pregnant woman with a fever above 38.1 degrees Celsius and symptoms indicative of listeriosis should be simultaneously tested and treated for presumptive listeriosis. For asymptomatic pregnant women who report consumption of a product that was recalled or implicated during a listeria outbreak, no testing or treatment is indicated. Expectant management is recommended for women who are afebrile, but have gastrointestinal or flu-like symptoms.

"These recommendations will help to inform the care that we give to our patients, and will help us to alleviate their concerns," Jeffrey L. Ecker, M.D., chair of the Committee on Obstetric Practice, said in a statement. "Fortunately most women who are exposed won't develop a listeria infection, and in many cases, careful observation for fever or other signs and symptoms is all that is needed."

Explore further: In the UK, signs of severe maternal sepsis should be regarded as an obstetric emergency

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

In the UK, signs of severe maternal sepsis should be regarded as an obstetric emergency

July 8, 2014
In the UK, about 50 pregnant and postnatal women develop life-threatening severe maternal sepsis (infection of the blood or "blood poisoning") for every woman who dies from the condition, according to a study from UK researchers ...

No connection between induced labor, autism

April 22, 2014
(HealthDay)—There is no connection between inducing labor in childbirth and autism, according to a new statement released Monday by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

US death toll from cantaloupe rises to 23

October 12, 2011
An outbreak of listeria in farm-grown cantaloupes has killed 23 people and sickened 116 more in the United States since late July, health authorities said Wednesday.

Food guidelines for pregnant women need review

March 21, 2012
A University of Newcastle study has identified a major diet dilemma for pregnant women and those trying to conceive – avoiding potentially ‘risky’ foods while maintaining an adequate nutrient intake.

Emerging antibiotic resistance in Listeria

January 24, 2013
Malaysian researchers have revealed the presence of multidrug-resistant strains of Listeria monocytogenes in frozen burger patties taken from supermarkets and other retail shops in Malaysia. The research was published in ...

Infected cantaloupes have killed 18 in US

October 4, 2011
Eighteen people have died and 100 people have fallen ill since late July in the United States from eating cantaloupes infected with listeria, health authorities said Tuesday.

Recommended for you

Women exposed to smoke while in womb more likely to miscarry

July 13, 2017
Women exposed to cigarette smoke while in their mothers' wombs are more likely to experience miscarriage as adults, according to new research from the University of Aberdeen.

Lack of a hormone in pregnant mice linked to preeclampsia

June 30, 2017
(Medical Xpress)—A team of researchers from Singapore, the Netherlands and Turkey has isolated a hormone in pregnant mice that appears to be associated with preeclampsia—a pregnancy-related condition characterized by ...

Aspirin reduces risk of pre-eclampsia in pregnant women

June 28, 2017
Taking a low-dose aspirin before bed can reduce the risk of pre-eclampsia, which can cause premature birth and, in extreme cases, maternal and foetal death.

The biology of uterine fluid: How it informs the fetus of mom's world

June 22, 2017
A developing fetus bathes in a mixture of cellular secretions and proteins unique to its mother's uterus. Before fertilization, the pH of uterine fluid helps create a conducive environment for sperm migration, and afterward, ...

New clues in puzzle over pre-eclampsia and cholesterol regulation

June 21, 2017
Scientists studying a mystery link between the dangerous pregnancy complication pre-eclampsia and an increased risk of heart disease in later life for both mother and child have uncovered important new clues.

Are maternal hormones different when carrying a boy or a girl?

June 15, 2017
With advances in prenatal testing it's now possible to find out whether a pregnancy will result in a male or female baby as early as eight weeks' gestation.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.