Mediterranean diet may keep your mind healthier in old age

October 21, 2015 by Maureen Salamon, Healthday Reporter

Mediterranean diet may keep your mind healthier in old age
Seniors who ate more foods tied to the eating plan, especially fish, had bigger brains, study says.
(HealthDay)—In news that sounds a bit like it came straight from a sci-fi thriller, researchers say that eating too much meat might shrink your brain.

On the flip side, however, eating healthy foods from the so-called Mediterranean may help your stay in good shape as you get older, the new study suggests. The researchers said that people over 65 who ate more fish, vegetables, fruit, grains and olive oil had a larger brain volume than a similar group who didn't follow a Mediterranean diet.

"It was encouraging to see that the more you adhere to this Mediterranean diet, the more protection you get against brain atrophy [shrinkage]," said study author Yian Gu, an assistant professor of neuropsychology at Columbia University in New York City. "For people interested in the diet and lifestyle factors leading to better health, I think this is another study consistent with previous studies that indicate the Mediterranean diet is a healthy diet," she added.

But Gu noted that her study's observational findings cannot prove a definitive cause-and-effect relationship between diet and brain volume. The study was only designed to find an association.

Findings from the research were published online Oct. 21 in the journal Neurology.

Previous research has linked the Mediterranean diet to a lower risk of Alzheimer's disease, the study said. The diet stresses the consumption of vegetables, legumes (beans, peas and lentils), fruits, cereals, fish and monounsaturated fats such as , the study authors said. The eating plan also includes a low intake of meat, poultry, saturated fats and dairy products, as well as mild to moderate amounts of alcohol, according to the researchers.

For the study, Gu and her colleagues split 674 adults into two groups based on how closely their diets aligned with the Mediterranean diet. Their average age was 80 years. All participants underwent MRI scans of their brains to measure total and thickness. They also completed questionnaires about their food choices and eating patterns.

The researchers found that brain volumes of those who didn't follow a Mediterranean diet were smaller than those who did. The difference was minor in overall size—equated to about five years of aging, the study authors said.

But, more specifically, the investigators found that eating more fish and less meat was associated with even less brain shrinkage.

Gu said scientists don't yet know exactly why the Mediterranean diet seems healthier for the brain. However, other research has established that a higher intake of fish and vegetables and a lower intake of meat are beneficial for brain cell growth, she said.

Dr. Joseph Masdeu, director of the Nantz National Alzheimer Center at Houston Methodist Hospital, praised the research as "an elegant way of looking at this [issue]."

Masdeu, who wasn't involved in the research, said, "I think the take-home message is clear . . . a diet containing less meat and perhaps more fish is good for you. There are negative studies [focusing on] the Mediterranean diet as well, but several confirming a positive effect. So it's tentative, but it's the strongest preventive approach we have [promoting brain health] together with exercise."

Using the study findings, Gu contended that eating at least 3 to 5 ounces of fish weekly, or no more than 3.5 ounces of meat each day, could protect the brain from shrinkage.

She acknowledged that study participants may have inaccurately recalled their food consumption habits in the questionnaires used.

"We asked people to recall their past dietary habits, so that's prone to recall bias," she said.

Dr. Malaz Boustani, a spokesperson for the American Federation for Aging Research, said the new study provided "very good messaging" for the public.

"This is an encouraging study that will really make us work harder to see how we can actually encourage people . . . to change their diet to accommodate the Mediterranean diet," said Boustani, also founding director of the Sandra Eskenazi Center for Brain Care Innovation at Indiana University. "It makes it very easy for people to do the right thing."

Explore further: Mediterranean diet may lower stroke risk, study finds

More information: The American Heart Association has more about the Mediterranean diet.

Related Stories

Mediterranean diet may lower stroke risk, study finds

February 12, 2015
(HealthDay)—A Mediterranean diet may reduce your risk of one type of stroke, new research suggests.

Mediterranean diet at risk as globalisation bites

June 11, 2015
Eating a Mediterranean diet has long been a byword for healthy living, but the very people who coined it are straying from sun-kissed fruits and legumes and their waistlines are paying the price.

High dietary fiber intake linked to health promoting short chain fatty acids

September 28, 2015
Eating a lot of fibre-rich foods, such as fruit, vegetables, and legumes—typical of a Mediterranean diet—is linked to a rise in health promoting short chain fatty acids, finds research published online in the journal ...

Eating a Mediterranean diet could cut womb cancer risk

May 27, 2015
Women who eat a Mediterranean diet could cut their risk of womb cancer by more than half (57 per cent), according to a study published today in the British Journal of Cancer.

Fruit and vegetables aren't only good for a healthy body—they protect your mind too

September 16, 2015
Eating a Mediterranean diet or other healthy dietary pattern, comprising of fruit, vegetables, legumes, and nuts and low in processed meats, is associated with preventing the onset of depression, according to research published ...

Recommended for you

Family dinners improve teens' eating habits no matter how well family functions, study finds

November 21, 2018
A new University of Guelph study has revealed teenagers and young adults who sit down for family dinners—regardless of how well the family unit manages daily routines, communicates and connects emotionally—are more likely ...

Teen personality traits linked to risk of death from any cause 50 years later

November 20, 2018
Personality traits evident as early as the teenage years may be linked to a heightened or lessened risk of death around 50 years later, suggests observational research of 'baby boomers,' published online in the Journal of ...

One in four U.S. adults sits more than eight hours a day

November 20, 2018
(HealthDay)—Couch Potato Nation: Nearly half of Americans sit for far too many hours a day and don't get any exercise at all, a new study finds.

Emotional abuse may be linked with menopause misery

November 19, 2018
Smoking, obesity and a sedentary lifestyle have long been linked to heightened symptoms of menopause. Now, a study headed by UC San Francisco has identified another factor that may add to menopause torment: an emotionally ...

Bullying and violence at work increases the risk of cardiovascular disease

November 19, 2018
People who are bullied at work or experience violence at work are at higher risk of heart and brain blood vessel problems, including heart attacks and stroke, according to the largest prospective study to investigate the ...

How AI could help veterinarians code their notes

November 19, 2018
A team led by scientists at the School of Medicine has developed an algorithm that can read the typed-out notes from veterinarians and predict specific diseases that the animal may have.

3 comments

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

dogbert
2 / 5 (4) Oct 21, 2015
The Mediterranean diet does seem to have some beneficial qualities, but qualifying just what causes those perceived benefits is difficult. The Mediterranean diet is not a single diet but multiple regional diets which are characterized in general with olive oil and fish.

Are the benefits due to the olive oil, the fish, other ingredients in the diet or the lesser emphasis on meat and dairy or is it a combination of factors?

In the U.S., there are large segments of the population who do not have easy access to fresh fish or seafood. For those, it will be difficult to follow such a diet particularly for ill defined ingredients.
Vietvet
3.7 / 5 (3) Oct 21, 2015
These "may this" and "may that" articles really don't belong in a science article.
Need to do better research and come up with real causes before publishing.


So sayeth the scientific illiterate nitwit.
antigoracle
1 / 5 (1) Oct 22, 2015
These "may this" and "may that" articles really don't belong in a science article.
Need to do better research and come up with real causes before publishing.


So sayeth the scientific illiterate nitwit.

Whoa!! The forum's degenerate troll actually post something. Vietvet, I know you're the "unfortunate" victim of Agent Orange, so perhaps you should stick to doing what you do best; down voting the heretics.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.