Are your multivitamins and supplements providing needed micronutrients?

October 13, 2015, Taylor & Francis

Multivitamin/Mineral Supplement Contribution to Micronutrient Intakes in the United States, 2007–2010 has been selected as the 2015 Ragus Award Winner as Best Article from the Journal of the American College of Nutrition, the official publication of the American College of Nutrition.

Multivitamin/mineral (MVMM) supplements are the most common dietary supplements consumed in the United States. This analysis assesses the contributions of to usual dietary intakes as derived from MVMM supplements. Micronutrients are needed in minuscule amounts and they enable the body to produce enzymes, hormones and other substances essential for proper growth and development. While necessary in very small amounts—the consequences of their absence are severe. In this research article, the contribution of micronutrients derived from MVMM supplements is compared to the intakes for US residents aged ≥ 4 years according to the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2007–2010 (n = 16,444).

The analysis points out that in large proportions of the population, micronutrient sufficiency is currently not being achieved through food solutions for several essential vitamins and minerals. Results showed that 51% of Americans consumed MVMM supplements containing 9 or fewer micronutrients. Also, large portions of the population had total usual intakes (food and MVMM supplement use) below the estimated average requirement for vitamins A (35%), C (31%), D (74%), and E (67%) as well as calcium (39%) and magnesium (46%).

Nevertheless, MVMM supplements contribute to a greater number of individuals meeting their recommended intakes of almost all micronutrients measured by NHANES. Use of age- and gender-specific MVMM may serve as a practical means to increase the micronutrient status in subpopulations of Americans while not increasing intakes above the tolerable upper level intake.

Explore further: Increasing calcium intake unlikely to boost bone health or prevent fractures, say experts

More information: Taylor C. Wallace et al. "Multivitamin/Mineral Supplement Contribution to Micronutrient Intakes in the United States, 2007–2010," Journal of the American College of Nutrition (2014). DOI: 10.1080/07315724.2013.846806

Related Stories

Increasing calcium intake unlikely to boost bone health or prevent fractures, say experts

September 29, 2015
Increasing calcium intake through dietary sources or supplements is unlikely to improve bone health or prevent fractures in older people, conclude two studies published in The BMJ this week. Collectively, these results suggest ...

Consumers understand supplements help fill nutrient gaps, new survey shows

July 1, 2015
The vast majority of consumers recognize that multivitamins, calcium and/or vitamin D supplements can help fill nutrient gaps but should not be viewed as replacements for a healthy diet, according to a new survey conducted ...

Monitoring the population's food and supplement intakes

March 8, 2012
Collecting data on what the U.S. population actually consumes is a key nutrition monitoring step. Nutritionists then translate "foods eaten" into "nutrients consumed." This snapshot of the population's food-nutrient intakes ...

Is dietary supplementation appropriate for children with autism spectrum disorder?

June 4, 2015
Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) are often picky eaters, which can lead parents to suspect that their children might not be getting adequate amounts of vitamins and minerals. This sometimes leads parents of children ...

Elite female athletes' health risk

November 18, 2013
Young female athletes representing South Australia in aesthetics sports such as gymnastics are putting their health at risk due to calcium and iron deficiencies, a Flinders University study has found.

Recommended for you

Low-cost anti-hookworm drug boosts female farmers' physical fitness

April 19, 2018
Impoverished female farm workers infected with intestinal parasites known as hookworms saw significant improvements in physical fitness when they were treated with a low-cost deworming drug. The benefits were seen even in ...

Low total testosterone in men widespread, linked to chronic disease

April 19, 2018
A male's total testosterone level may be linked to more than just sexual health and muscle mass preservation, a new study finds. Low amounts of the hormone could also be associated with chronic disease, even among men 40 ...

What happens to our muscles during spaceflight and when living on Mars?

April 17, 2018
The inactivity of astronauts during spaceflights presents a significant risk to their muscles, says a new study in The Journal of Physiology. Scientists have simulated the impact of 21 day spaceflights on the body, and the ...

Parental diet before conception affects child's health

April 17, 2018
A child's health can be compromised not only by a mother who smokes or drinks during pregnancy, but by the obesity and poor diet of both parents well before the act of procreation, researchers said Tuesday.

Exercise, not vitamins, urged to prevent falls in seniors

April 17, 2018
Falling is the leading cause of injury-related death among people over age 65, and seniors who want to avoid falls should exercise, not rely on supplements like vitamin D, US guidelines said Tuesday.

Kids hit hard by junk food advertising: new research

April 17, 2018
Junk food ads are shown more frequently on TV at times when many children are watching, new Heart Foundation-funded research shows.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.