Digital health intervention does not lower heart attack risk

May 18, 2016, The JAMA Network Journals

In a study published online by JAMA Cardiology, Sonia S. Anand, M.D., Ph.D., F.R.C.P.C., of McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, and colleagues examined whether a digital health intervention using email and text messages designed to change diet and physical activity would improve heart attack risk among a South Asian population.

People who originate from the Indian subcontinent, known as South Asians, have an increased risk for premature myocardial infarction (MI; heart attack) compared with white individuals. Few interventions have been designed and tested to lower the risk for MI in this high-risk ethnic group. With advances in technology, behavioral interventions can be delivered to high-risk populations using email, web-based strategies, mobile phone applications, and text messages.

In this study, South Asian men and women 30 years or older and living in Ontario and British Columbia who were free of cardiovascular disease were randomly assigned to a digital intervention (DHI; n = 169) or control condition (n = 174). The goal-setting DHI used emails or text messages and focused on improving diet and that was tailored to the participant's self-reported stage of change (participant's motivation to make health behavior changes). The change in an MI risk score (based on factors such as blood pressure, waist to hip ratio, hemoglobin A1c level) from baseline to 1 year was the primary outcome for the study. Participants were also provided information regarding their for MI.

The researchers found that the DHI using motivational messages and health tips was not effective in reducing the MI risk score. Knowledge of genetic risk was not a motivator for behavior change.

"Future trials should consider using more frequent text messaging and have bidirectional communication with participants," the authors write.

Explore further: Telomere length tied to higher myocardial infarction risk

More information: JAMA Cardiology. Published online May 18, 2016; DOI: 10.1001/jamacardio.2016.1035

Related Stories

Telomere length tied to higher myocardial infarction risk

April 12, 2016
(HealthDay)—Telomere length (TL) is associated with an increased risk of myocardial infarction (MI), according to a study published in the April 19 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Lifestyle focused text messaging results in improvement in cardiovascular risk factors

September 22, 2015
A simple, low-cost automated program of semi-personalized mobile phone text messages supporting lifestyle change led to improvement in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels, blood pressure, body mass index, and ...

Research suggests stroke risk up with beta-blockers in select patients

October 8, 2014
(HealthDay)—For patients without prior myocardial infarction (MI) with no heart failure, β-blocker use is not associated with lower cardiovascular events, and there may be an increased risk of stroke for patients without ...

Young women with diabetes have six-fold risk of heart attack

August 31, 2015
Women aged 45 years and under with diabetes have a six-fold risk of heart attack, according to research presented at ESC Congress today. The study in more than 7 000 women also found that young women who had a heart attack ...

Time-updated hemoglobin A1c variables linked to MI risk

June 8, 2015
(HealthDay)—Time-updated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) variables have a stronger association with myocardial infarction (MI) than baseline HbA1c, according to a study published online May 26 in Diabetes Care.

Genetic vitamin K1 levels linked to heart disease

April 18, 2016
(HealthDay)—Genetically determined vitamin K1 is associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) and myocardial infarction (MI), according to a study published online April 8 in the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

Recommended for you

Research team traces pathway to cardioprotection in post-ischemic heart failure

December 11, 2018
During an ischemic attack, the heart is temporarily robbed of its blood supply. The aftermath is devastating: reduced heart contractility, heart cell death, and heart failure. Contributing to these detrimental changes is ...

Macrophage cells key to helping heart repair—and potentially regenerate, new study finds

December 11, 2018
Scientists at the Peter Munk Cardiac Centre have identified the type of cell key to helping the heart repair and potentially regenerate following a heart attack.

Study reveals new link between atrial fibrillation and mutations in heart disease gene

December 11, 2018
Atrial fibrillation (Afib), a heart condition that causes a rapid, irregular heartbeat that increases a person's risk of stroke and heart failure, is fairly common among older adults. However, its early onset form is relatively ...

Researchers have found that incidence of heart failure was around two-fold higher in people with diabetes

December 11, 2018
Researchers have found that incidence of heart failure was around two-fold higher in people with diabetes.

Workplace exposure to pesticides and metals linked to heightened heart disease risk

December 11, 2018
Workplace exposure to metals and pesticides is linked to a heightened risk of heart disease in Hispanic and Latino workers, reveals research published online in the journal Heart.

Study: Age, race differences determine risk of stroke in women and men

December 11, 2018
A new study found that, between the ages of 45 and 74 years, white women were less likely to have a stroke than white men, but at age 75 and older, there was no difference in stroke risk between white women and men. In contrast, ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.