Researchers identify bacterial infection as a possible cause of bladder condition

Researchers identify bacterial infection as a possible cause of bladder condition

A team led by researchers at the University of Kent has identified as a possible cause of Overactive Bladder Syndrome (OAB).

OAB is a condition where the spontaneously contracts before the is full. In the USA, it is ranked in the top 10 of common chronic conditions, competing with both diabetes and depression, with a reported prevalence of up to 31-42% in the adult population.

The researchers, including the Kent team from the Medway School of Pharmacy, found that some OAB patients had a low-grade which is missed by conventional NHS tests. This low-grade inflammation may ultimately result in increased sensory nerve excitation and the symptoms of OAB.

The study found that in these patients the low-grade inflammation is associated with bacteria living inside the bladder wall. This was an observational study which means that no conclusions can be drawn about cause and effect. However, the findings may prompt the clinical re-classification of OAB and inform future therapeutic strategies. These might include protracted treatment with antibiotics to alleviate the symptoms of OAB in some individuals.


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Bacteria in urine could contribute to overactive bladder

More information: Alberto Contreras-Sanz et al, Altered urothelial ATP signalling in major subset of human overactive bladder patients with pyuria, American Journal of Physiology - Renal Physiology (2016). DOI: 10.1152/ajprenal.00339.2015
Provided by University of Kent
Citation: Researchers identify bacterial infection as a possible cause of bladder condition (2016, July 7) retrieved 21 August 2019 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2016-07-bacterial-infection-bladder-condition.html
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