Eliminate sweetened drinks, cut kids' sugar intake

September 26, 2016

(HealthDay)—Looking for the quickest way to cut added sugar from your kid's diet?

Eliminate sugar-sweetened drinks, a nutrition expert says.

Added sugar is a term used to describe any sugars that are added to foods or used in the processing and preparing foods or beverages. This includes sweeteners like sugar, fructose and honey.

"Children who start consuming a lot of added sugar, particularly in beverages at an early age, are more likely to develop all the things that contribute to , such as high triglycerides, diabetes and excess weight, all of which increase your chances of developing heart disease," said Jo Ann Carson. She is a professor of clinical nutrition at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center School of Health Professions.

Children younger than 2 should not have any added sugars in their diet. Young people between the ages of 2 and 18 should get no more than 25 grams of added sugar each day, according to the American Heart Association (AHA).

"That's the equivalent of just six of those white sugar packets," Carson said in a center news release.

However, the average American child consumes closer to 80 grams of sugar a day. The best way for parents to curb their children's added sugar intake is to eliminate , such as sodas, juices, and , she advised.

There are more than 20 grams of sugar in just one 8-ounce glass of lemonade or sports drink, Carson explained. She recommends replacing these high-sugar beverages with water and low-fat milk to significantly reduce kids' overall sugar intake.

Explore further: Study: Confusion surrounds added vs. natural sugar in drinks

More information: The U.S. Department of Agriculture provides more information on added sugars.

Related Stories

Study: Confusion surrounds added vs. natural sugar in drinks

December 17, 2013
(Medical Xpress)—Consumers who are more concerned about what types of sugars are in their drinks will likely choose a less-sweetened beverage, although most people don't know the difference between natural and added sugars, ...

Study reveals Australian children overdosing on sugar

October 19, 2012
More than half of young Australians are consuming too much sugar, according to a new study from researchers at the University of Wollongong and University of Sydney.

Moderate consumption of sugary drinks has little impact on adolescents' metabolic health

November 12, 2014
Sugar-sweetened beverages are the largest source of added sugar in the diets of adolescents in the United States, and young adults ages 15-20 consume more of these drinks than any other age group, according to the Centers ...

Children should eat less than 25 grams of added sugars daily

August 22, 2016
Children ages 2 to 18 should eat or drink less than six teaspoons of added sugars daily, according to the scientific statement recommending a specific limit on added sugars for children, published in the American Heart Association ...

Sugar-sweetened drinks linked to increased visceral fat

January 11, 2016
Drinking sugar-sweetened beverages every day was associated with an increase in a particular type of body fat that may affect diabetes and heart disease risk, according to new research in the American Heart Association's ...

New research exposes the health risks of fructose and sugary drinks

September 28, 2015
There is compelling evidence that drinking too many sugar-sweetened beverages, which contain added sugars in the form of high fructose corn syrup or table sugar (sucrose), can lead to excess weight gain and a greater risk ...

Recommended for you

Babies and toddlers at greater risk from second-hand smoke than previously thought, study finds

December 16, 2018
Infants and toddlers in low-income communities may be even more at risk from second- and third-hand smoke exposure than has been believed, according to new federally supported research.

A co-worker's rudeness can affect your sleep—and your partner's, study finds

December 14, 2018
Rudeness. Sarcastic comments. Demeaning language. Interrupting or talking over someone in a meeting. Workplace incivilities such as these are becoming increasingly common, and a new study from Portland State University and ...

A holiday gift to primary care doctors: Proof of their time crunch

December 14, 2018
The average primary care doctor needs to work six more hours a day than they already do, in order to make sure their patients get all the preventive and early-detection care they want and deserve, a new study finds.

Teens get more sleep with later school start time, researchers find

December 12, 2018
When Seattle Public Schools announced that it would reorganize school start times across the district for the fall of 2016, the massive undertaking took more than a year to deploy. Elementary schools started earlier, while ...

Large restaurant portions a global problem, study finds

December 12, 2018
A new multi-country study finds that large, high-calorie portion sizes in fast food and full service restaurants is not a problem unique to the United States. An international team of researchers found that 94 percent of ...

Receiving genetic information can change risk

December 11, 2018
Millions of people in the United States alone have submitted their DNA for analysis and received information that not only predicts their risk for disease but, it turns out, in some cases might also have influenced that risk, ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.