Higher coffee consumption associated with lower risk of death

August 28, 2017
Credit: George Hodan/public domain

Higher coffee consumption is associated with a lower risk of death, according to research presented today at ESC Congress. The observational study in nearly 20 000 participants suggests that coffee can be part of a healthy diet in healthy people.

"Coffee is one of the most widely consumed beverages around the world," said Dr Adela Navarro, a cardiologist at Hospital de Navarra, Pamplona, Spain. "Previous studies have suggested that drinking coffee might be inversely associated with all-cause mortality but this has not been investigated in a Mediterranean country."

The purpose of this study was to examine the association between and the risk of mortality in a middle-aged Mediterranean cohort. The study was conducted within the framework of the Seguimiento Universidad de Navarra (SUN) Project, a long-term in more than 22 500 Spanish university graduates which started in 1999.

This analysis included 19 896 participants of the SUN Project, whose average age at enrolment was 37.7 years old. On entering the study, participants completed a previously validated semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire to collect information on coffee consumption, lifestyle and sociodemographic characteristics, anthropometric measurements, and previous health conditions.

Patients were followed-up for an average of ten years. Information on mortality was obtained from study participants and their families, postal authorities, and the National Death Index. Cox regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for incident mortality according to baseline total coffee consumption adjusted for potential confounders.

During the ten year period, 337 participants died. The researchers found that participants who consumed at least four cups of coffee per day had a 64% lower risk of all-cause mortality than those who never or almost never consumed coffee (adjusted HR, 0.36; 95% CI, 0.19-0.70). There was a 22% lower risk of all-cause mortality for each two additional cups of coffee per day (adjusted HR, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.66-0.92).

The researchers examined whether sex, age or adherence to the Mediterranean diet had any influence on the association between baseline coffee consumption and mortality. They observed a significant interaction between coffee consumption and age (p for interaction=0.0016). In those who were at least 45 years old, drinking two additional cups of coffee per day was associated with a 30% lower risk of mortality during follow-up (adjusted HR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.58-0.85). The association was not significant among younger participants.

Dr Navarro said: "In the SUN project we found an inverse association between drinking coffee and the risk of all-cause mortality, particularly in people aged 45 years and above. This may be due to a stronger protective association among older participants."

She concluded: "Our findings suggest that drinking four cups of each day can be part of a in healthy people."

Explore further: Does coffee help you live longer?

Related Stories

Does coffee help you live longer?

August 2, 2017
Can drinking coffee help you live longer? Two studies report that it may be true.

Drinking coffee could lead to a longer life, research says

July 10, 2017
Here's another reason to start the day with a cup of joe: Scientists have found that people who drink coffee appear to live longer.

Drinking coffee reduces risk of death from all causes, study finds

July 10, 2017
People who drink around three cups of coffee a day may live longer than non-coffee drinkers, a landmark study has found.

Drinking more coffee could reduce liver cancer risk, suggests study

May 29, 2017
Drinking more coffee could reduce the risk of developing the most common form of primary liver cancer, according to a study led by the University of Southampton.

Coffee consumption linked with reduced risk of diabetes

February 17, 2014
(HealthDay)—Higher consumption of coffee is associated with lower risk of type 2 diabetes, according to research published in the February issue of Diabetes Care.

New research suggests moderate coffee consumption is not associated with increased CVD risk

September 27, 2013
Coffee is one of the most extensively researched components in the diet. New studies are regularly being added to the already large body of scientific research, which overall suggests that moderate habitual coffee consumption ...

Recommended for you

Three million Americans carry loaded handguns daily, study finds

October 19, 2017
An estimated 3 million adult American handgun owners carry a firearm loaded and on their person on a daily basis, and 9 million do so on a monthly basis, new research indicates. The vast majority cited protection as their ...

More teens than ever aren't getting enough sleep

October 19, 2017
If you're a young person who can't seem to get enough sleep, you're not alone: A new study led by San Diego State University Professor of Psychology Jean Twenge finds that adolescents today are sleeping fewer hours per night ...

Across Asia, liver cancer is linked to herbal remedies: study

October 18, 2017
Researchers have uncovered widespread evidence of a link between traditional Chinese herbal remedies and liver cancer across Asia, a study said Wednesday.

Eating better throughout adult years improves physical fitness in old age, suggests study

October 18, 2017
People who have a healthier diet throughout their adult lives are more likely to be stronger and fitter in older age than those who don't, according to a new study led by the University of Southampton.

Global calcium consumption appears low, especially in Asia

October 18, 2017
Daily calcium intake among adults appears to vary quite widely around the world in distinct regional patterns, according to a new systematic review of research data ahead of World Osteoporosis Day on Friday, Oct. 20.

New study: Nearly half of US medical care comes from emergency rooms

October 17, 2017
Nearly half of all US medical care is delivered by emergency departments, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM). And in recent years, the percentage of care delivered ...

4 comments

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

zorro6204
5 / 5 (1) Aug 28, 2017
That's almost unbelievable. But surely the focus now should be on identifying the chemicals responsible and extracting them into a supplement. I don't want to drink four cups of coffee a day! Ever smell anyone's breath who drinks that much coffee? Yeesh.
Jayarava
1 / 5 (1) Aug 28, 2017
The risk of death from "all causes" is always 100%. That is all it can ever be. We all die and there is usually an identifiable cause. So there is something drastically wrong here. Probably the silo-mentality has allowed the scientists concerned to adopt a nonsense definition of something that makes no sense outside the silo.

Whatever coffee might do, it does not lower the risk of death in any absolute sense - that risk is always 100%. So it has to be risk of death in a specified time-frame and/or from a specific cause. And these ought to have been specified above.
antialias_physorg
not rated yet Aug 28, 2017
"Our findings suggest that drinking four cups of coffee each day can be part of a healthy diet in healthy people."

Hmm..most anything healthy people do can be part of a healthy diet. Because they're healthy, you know?
Gigel
5 / 5 (1) Aug 28, 2017
"Our findings suggest that drinking four cups of coffee each day can be part of a healthy diet in healthy people."

And if we get connected to a tremor-driven generator, we could actually produce electricity!

And any coffee crisis will give a national headache.

I'm curious whether the effects they observed really depend on coffeine. If not, decaffeinated coffee would be better.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.