Caffeine linked to lower risk of death in women with diabetes

September 13, 2017, Diabetologia
Credit: CC0 Public Domain

Women with diabetes who regularly drink caffeinated coffee or tea may live longer than those who don't consume caffeine at all, according to new research being presented at this year's European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) Annual Meeting in Lisbon, Portugal (11-15 September). No association was found for men with diabetes.

This observational study found that the more caffeine consumed the lower their risk of dying compared to those who never consumed caffeine. Importantly, the depended on the source of the caffeine: higher levels of caffeine consumption from were associated with a reduced risk of death from any cause, particularly from cardiovascular disease; while women who consumed more caffeine from tea were less likely to die from cancer.

More than 80% of the world's adult population consume caffeine daily, mostly from coffee and tea. Average daily coffee consumption is between 100 mg and 300 mg per day, depending on age and country. The mean in the USA, for example, is 165 mg per day. Many studies have shown a of drinking coffee on the risk of death from all causes in the general population, but little is known about the role of caffeine on mortality in people with diabetes.

In this study, a group of medical residents from various institutions in Portugal (Dr. João Sérgio Neves and Professor Davide Carvalho from the University of Porto and colleagues across Portugal examined the association between varying levels of caffeine intake and mortality in over 3,000 men and women with diabetes from the 1999 to 2010 National Health Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES)—a study tracking the health and nutritional status of a nationally representative sample of adults in the USA since 1971. Participants reported their from coffee, tea, and soft drinks when they entered the study using 24-hour dietary recalls—structured interviews to accurately assess intake for the previous 24 hours.

Over the course of the 11-year study, 618 people died. The researchers found that women with diabetes who consumed up to 100mg per day (one regular cup of coffee) were 51% less likely to die than those who consumed no caffeine; women with diabetes who consumed 100-200mg per day had a 57% lower risk of death compared with non-consumers, and for those consuming over 200mg per day (2 regular cups of coffee) the reduced risk of death was 66%.

This association was independent of influential factors including age, race, education level, annual family income, smoking, body mass index, alcohol intake, high blood pressure, and diabetic kidney disease. No beneficial effect of caffeine consumption was noted in men with diabetes.

There was a decrease in cancer related mortality among women that consumed more caffeine from tea. When divided into four groups of tea consumption (zero, low, medium, high), the high caffeine from tea consumers had an 80% reduced risk of cancer compared with women with zero caffeine consumption from tea. However, as the overall consumption of tea was low in this cohort, these results must be interpreted with caution and considered as exploratory, requiring confirmation in larger studies.

The authors conclude: "Our study showed a dose-dependent protective effect of on all-cause mortality among women. The effect on mortality appears to depend on the source of caffeine, with a protective effect of coffee on all-cause mortality and cardiovascular mortality, and a protective effect of caffeine from tea on cancer among women with . However our observational study cannot prove that reduces the risk of death but only suggests the possibility of such a protective effect."

Explore further: Could caffeine help prevent dementia?

Related Stories

Could caffeine help prevent dementia?

October 3, 2016
A new study suggests a significant relationship between caffeine and dementia prevention, though it stops short of establishing cause and effect.

Is there a link between coffee drinking and mortality?

February 19, 2013
(Medical Xpress)—A large study of nearly half a million older adults followed for about 12 years revealed a clear trend: as coffee drinking increased, the risk of death decreased. Study author Neal Freedman, PhD, MPH, National ...

Increased caffeinated coffee consumption associated with decreased risk of depression in women

September 26, 2011
The risk of depression appears to decrease for women with increasing consumption of caffeinated coffee, according to a report in the September 26 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine.

Caffeine intake associated with lower incidence of tinnitus

August 7, 2014
New research from Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) finds that higher caffeine intake is associated with lower rates of tinnitus, often described as a ringing or buzzing sound in the ear when there is no outside source of ...

Caffeine linked to low birth weight babies

February 18, 2013
Maternal nutrition is important to a developing embryo and to the health of the child later in life. Supplementing the diet with specific vitamins is known to increase health of the foetus for example folic acid (vitamin ...

Recommended for you

Sweet, bitter, fat: New study reveals impact of genetics on how kids snack

February 22, 2018
Whether your child asks for crackers, cookies or veggies to snack on could be linked to genetics, according to new findings from the Guelph Family Health Study at the University of Guelph.

The good and bad health news about your exercise posts on social media

February 22, 2018
We all have that Facebook friend—or 10—who regularly posts photos of his or her fitness pursuits: on the elliptical at the gym, hiking through the wilderness, crossing a 10K finish line.

Smartphones are bad for some teens, not all

February 21, 2018
Is the next generation better or worse off because of smartphones? The answer is complex and research shows it largely depends on their lives offline.

Tackling health problems in the young is crucial for their children's future

February 21, 2018
A child's growth and development is affected by the health and lifestyles of their parents before pregnancy - even going back to adolescence - according to a new study by researchers at the Murdoch Children's Research Institute, ...

Lead and other toxic metals found in e-cigarette 'vapors': study

February 21, 2018
Significant amounts of toxic metals, including lead, leak from some e-cigarette heating coils and are present in the aerosols inhaled by users, according to a study from scientists at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public ...

Why teens need up to 10 hours' sleep

February 21, 2018
Technology, other distractions and staying up late make is difficult, but researchers say teenagers need to make time for 8-10 hours of sleep a night to optimise their performance and maintain good health and wellbeing.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.