How healthy is your diet? Online study on nutrition evaluation

September 13, 2017
How healthy is your diet? Online study on nutrition evaluation
Credit: University of Reading

Free personalized online nutritional guidance is being offered by nutritionists as part of a new trial run by the University of Reading.

EatWellUK is a new study using a straightforward designed and developed at the University of Reading centered on physical and food questionnaires, which can evaluate the quality of your and generate a personalised nutrition report.

The University of Reading is now looking for volunteers to take part in the trial and receive free guidance about their diet and physical activity.

Dr Faustina Hwang, an associate professor of Biomedical Engineering at the University of Reading said:

"This is an exciting study which we are hoping provides an easy to use platform for personalized nutrition information.

"Non-communicable diseases kill 40 million people each year, and healthy diets and physical activity play a key role in the prevention of diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, cancer and diabetes. We hope that new technologies like the EatWellUK app can make personalized nutrition advice more accessible to the wider public, and help people to have healthier diets."

Participating in this study involves three online interactions of approximately 20 minutes each. You will be asked to create an account in the study website, provide information about your characteristics (gender, age, height and weight), and complete a physical activity and a diet questionnaire. You will need to repeat the and diet questionnaires after 6 and 12 weeks.

Rodrigo Zenun Franco, who designed the web application said:

"The web application has been designed to be as simple to use as possible, and can be browsed from different devices, such as laptops, tablets, and smartphones. It's our hope that as many people as possible, even people who might be concerned about using an app like this, can benefit from personalised nutritional information."

Volunteers can sign up online on the EatWellUK website, and will need to be 18 and over living in the UK, without any diagnosed health conditions (e.g. diabetes), without any food allergies or intolerances, who are not on a special (e.g. pregnancy or vegan) and who are not receiving face-to-face nutritional services at the moment.

More can be found at eatwelluk.org

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