Inverse association seen for coffee drinking, markers of CVD

October 24, 2017

(HealthDay)—There appears to be an inverse association between coffee intake and protein markers linked to cardiovascular disease, according to a study published online Oct. 16 in the Journal of Internal Medicine.

Marilyn C. Cornelis, Ph.D., from Northwestern University in Chicago, and colleagues performed an analysis of known and novel linked to and their association with habitual . Initial analysis used dietary records data from the Prospective Study of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS; n = 816), and the top proteins were validated using data from the Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men (ULSAM, n = 635) and EpiHealth (n = 2,418).

The researchers found that after adjustment for age, sex, smoking and body mass index, four protein-coffee associations met statistical significance in PIVUS: leptin (LEP), chitinase-3-like protein 1 (CHI3L), (TNF) receptor 6, and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand. In the two validation sets, a similar inverse association between coffee intake and LEP was found, but the negative coffee-CHI3L association was replicated only in EpiHealth.

"The coffee-CHI3L1 association is novel and warrants further investigation given links between CHI3L1 and health conditions that are also potentially influenced by coffee," the authors write.

One author disclosed financial ties to a proteomics company.

Explore further: Coffee, caffeine not linked to psoriasis in U.S. women

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