Inverse association seen for coffee drinking, markers of CVD

October 24, 2017

(HealthDay)—There appears to be an inverse association between coffee intake and protein markers linked to cardiovascular disease, according to a study published online Oct. 16 in the Journal of Internal Medicine.

Marilyn C. Cornelis, Ph.D., from Northwestern University in Chicago, and colleagues performed an analysis of known and novel linked to and their association with habitual . Initial analysis used dietary records data from the Prospective Study of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS; n = 816), and the top proteins were validated using data from the Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men (ULSAM, n = 635) and EpiHealth (n = 2,418).

The researchers found that after adjustment for age, sex, smoking and body mass index, four protein-coffee associations met statistical significance in PIVUS: leptin (LEP), chitinase-3-like protein 1 (CHI3L), (TNF) receptor 6, and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand. In the two validation sets, a similar inverse association between coffee intake and LEP was found, but the negative coffee-CHI3L association was replicated only in EpiHealth.

"The coffee-CHI3L1 association is novel and warrants further investigation given links between CHI3L1 and health conditions that are also potentially influenced by coffee," the authors write.

One author disclosed financial ties to a proteomics company.

Explore further: Coffee, caffeine not linked to psoriasis in U.S. women

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Coffee, caffeine not linked to psoriasis in U.S. women

March 21, 2012
(HealthDay) -- Coffee and caffeine are not associated with psoriasis incidence after adjustment for smoking, according to a research letter published in the March issue of the Archives of Dermatology.

Caffeine linked to lower risk of death in women with diabetes

September 13, 2017
Women with diabetes who regularly drink caffeinated coffee or tea may live longer than those who don't consume caffeine at all, according to new research being presented at this year's European Association for the Study of ...

Higher coffee consumption associated with lower risk of death

August 28, 2017
Higher coffee consumption is associated with a lower risk of death, according to research presented today at ESC Congress. The observational study in nearly 20 000 participants suggests that coffee can be part of a healthy ...

Inverse link for coffee intake, cholecystectomy risk

June 2, 2015
(HealthDay)—For premenopausal women and those using hormone replacement therapy (HRT), there is an inverse association between coffee consumption and risk of cholecystectomy, according to a study published in the June issue ...

No link for tea, coffee intake with barrett's esophagus

May 5, 2016
(HealthDay)—After adjustment for confounding variables there is no correlation between the risk of Barrett's esophagus (BE) and tea or coffee consumption, according to a study published in the May issue of Clinical Gastroenterology ...

Dietary factors linked to risk of acute pancreatitis

January 30, 2017
(HealthDay)—Dietary factors are associated with pancreatitis, with saturated fat and cholesterol positively linked to gallstone-related acute pancreatitis (AP), according to a study published in the February issue of Clinical ...

Recommended for you

Don't eat bitter pumpkin, study warns after women lose hair

May 25, 2018
A doctor warned Friday that bitter-tasting pumpkins and squashes can contain potent toxins, after two women were poisoned by their dinners and lost most of their hair.

Hot cars can hit deadly temperatures in as little as one hour

May 24, 2018
A lot can happen at 160 degrees Fahrenheit: Eggs fry, salmonella bacteria dies, and human skin will suffer third-degree burns. If a car is parked in the sun on a hot summer day, its dashboard can hit 160 degrees in about ...

Research finds a little exercise does a lot of good for ageing muscles

May 24, 2018
Getting old doesn't necessarily mean getting weak and frail – just a little bit of exercise can help maintain muscle mass and strength, Otago research has revealed.

In helping smokers quit, cash is king, e-cigarettes strike out

May 23, 2018
Free smoking cessation aids, such as nicotine patches and chewing gum, are a staple of many corporate wellness programs aimed at encouraging employees to kick the habit. But, new research shows that merely offering such aids ...

What makes us well? Diversity, health care, and public transit matter

May 23, 2018
Diverse neighbors. Health centers. Commuter trains. These community attributes, and other key factors, are linked to well-being and quality of life, according to Yale researchers.

Time spent sitting at a screen matters less if you are fit and strong

May 23, 2018
The impact of screen time on cardiovascular disease, cancer incidence and mortality may be greatest in people who have lower levels of grip-strength, fitness and physical activity, according to a study published in the open ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.