Workers at smaller companies less likely to be screened for cancer

October 12, 2017

A new study by American Cancer Society investigators finds workers at organizations with fewer than 25 employees are less likely to have been screened for three cancers, as were people working in certain occupations. The study appears in Preventive Medicine.

Background: Cancer screening patterns according to occupation characteristics in the United States are not well known, but could be used to help inform cancer control efforts.

Study: Investigators led by Stacey Fedewa, Ph.D. at the American Cancer Society examined screening rates for cervical, breast, and colorectal cancer by occupational characteristics in 2010, 2013 and 2015 using National Health Interview Surveys (NHIS) among eligible US workers.

Results: Cervical, breast and prevalence among US workers was 84.0%, 68.9%, and 56.8%, respectively. Screening rates were lower among workers in small (< 25 employees) compared to large organizations (? 500 employees). People in food service, construction, production, and sales occupations were 13-26%, 17-28% and 9-30% less likely to be up to date with cervical, breast, and screening, respectively, compared to healthcare professionals. After adjusting for socioeconomic factors and insurance status, most of the difference was eliminated.

Conclusion: Disparities in cancer screening by occupational characteristics were mostly attributed to lower socioeconomic status and lack of insurance. The findings underscore the need for innovative public health strategies to improve in vulnerable populations.

Explore further: Cancer screening increase may reflect Affordable Care Act provision

More information: Stacey A. Fedewa et al, Disparities in cancer screening by occupational characteristics, Preventive Medicine (2017). DOI: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2017.10.012

Related Stories

Cancer screening increase may reflect Affordable Care Act provision

June 4, 2015
Screening for colorectal cancer increased in lower socioeconomic status (SES) individuals after 2008, perhaps reflecting the Affordable Care Act's removal of financial barriers to screening according to a new analysis. The ...

Insurance coverage for CT colonography increases likelihood of screening

July 11, 2017
People with insurance policies that cover CT colonography for colorectal cancer screening are almost 50 percent more likely to get screened than those whose policies don't cover the procedure, according to a new study appearing ...

Improving cervical cancer screening rates for transgender men

September 8, 2017
A new study indicates that alternative options for cervical cancer screening, including self-sampling for human papilloma virus (HPV) testing, could improve the screening rate among transgender men. More than half of the ...

More cancers diagnosed at early stage following increase in health insurance coverage

May 18, 2017
An analysis of nearly 273,000 patients showed that between 2013 and 2014 there was a 1 percent increase in the percentage of breast, lung, and colorectal cancers diagnosed at the earliest, most treatable stage. Considering ...

Breast and cervical cancer screening rates are low in women with advanced kidney disease

December 29, 2016
A new study indicates that many women with advanced kidney disease are not receiving recommended breast or cervical cancer screening, even though they face a higher risk of developing cancer than women in the general population. ...

Study finds low rate of cancer screening among transplant patients

May 9, 2017
People who have received organ transplants are at higher risk of developing and dying of cancer than the general population. Yet their rates of cancer screening do not meet existing guidelines, a new study has found.

Recommended for you

Symptom burden may increase hospital length of stay, readmission risk in advanced cancer

October 23, 2017
Hospitalized patients with advanced cancer who report more intense and numerous physical and psychological symptoms appear to be at risk for longer hospital stays and unplanned hospital readmissions. The report from a Massachusetts ...

CAR-T immunotherapy may help blood cancer patients who don't respond to standard treatments

October 20, 2017
Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis is one of the first centers nationwide to offer a new immunotherapy that targets certain blood cancers. Newly approved ...

Researchers pinpoint causes for spike in breast cancer genetic testing

October 20, 2017
A sharp rise in the number of women seeking BRCA genetic testing to evaluate their risk of developing breast cancer was driven by multiple factors, including celebrity endorsement, according to researchers at the University ...

Study shows how nerves drive prostate cancer

October 19, 2017
In a study in today's issue of Science, researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, part of Montefiore Medicine, report that certain nerves sustain prostate cancer growth by triggering a switch that causes tumor vessels ...

Gene circuit switches on inside cancer cells, triggers immune attack

October 19, 2017
Researchers at MIT have developed a synthetic gene circuit that triggers the body's immune system to attack cancers when it detects signs of the disease.

One to 10 mutations are needed to drive cancer, scientists find

October 19, 2017
For the first time, scientists have provided unbiased estimates of the number of mutations needed for cancers to develop, in a study of more than 7,500 tumours across 29 cancer types. Researchers from the Wellcome Trust Sanger ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.