Polyethylene glycol deemed less effective for colon prep

December 6, 2017

(HealthDay)—Pulsed irrigation evacuation (PIE) and sodium phosphate are superior to polyethylene glycol (PEG) for colon preparations prior to colonoscopy, according to a study published online Nov. 21 in the Journal of Digestive Diseases.

Kamran Ayub, M.D., from Silver Cross Hospital in New Lenox, Ill., and colleagues compared screening colonoscopy colon prep methods: PIE (135 ), PEG (129 patients), and (127 patients) among 391 outpatients at a Veterans Affairs hospital (mean age, 62 years; 75 percent men).

The researchers found that PIE and sodium phosphate were superior to PEG, with both receiving a score of four on a five-point scale (blind assessment), versus a three for PEG (P < 0.01). PEG was associated with more inadequate preps, compared to PIE (18 versus 5 percent; P < 0.01). Vomiting was reported in 37 percent of patients with sodium phosphate, 5 percent with PEG, and 2 percent with PIE (P < 0.01).

"PIE would be the preferred preparation for those at high risk for unsatisfactory preparations or with unsatisfactory traditional preparations," the authors write.

PIE Medical International donated the PIE machine and supplies for this study.

Explore further: Split-dose better than day-before colonoscopy prep

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