Abdominal obstetric binder helpful for cecal intubation

January 9, 2018

(HealthDay)—Use of an abdominal obstetric binder (AOB) is associated with a faster and more effective colonoscope insertion during outpatient colonoscopy, according to a study published online Jan. 2 in the Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

GuangQiu Yu, from Suzhou University in China, and colleagues prospectively evaluated 451 consecutive outpatient colonoscopies performed by one experienced endoscopist. Patients were separated into two groups: those receiving colonoscopy with (224 participants) or without (227 ) an AOB attached to the abdomen.

The researchers found that in the with an AOB attached, cecal intubation time and cecal intubation length of the colonoscope were significantly lower than in the group without an AOB. The patients in this group also had significantly fewer position changes and manual pressure as well as significantly less patient-reported abdominal distension.

"During colonoscopy, the application of an abdominal obstetric binder provided a significantly faster and more effective insertion," the authors write.

Explore further: Nurses can perform colonoscopies as well as docs

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