Abdominal obstetric binder helpful for cecal intubation

January 9, 2018

(HealthDay)—Use of an abdominal obstetric binder (AOB) is associated with a faster and more effective colonoscope insertion during outpatient colonoscopy, according to a study published online Jan. 2 in the Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

GuangQiu Yu, from Suzhou University in China, and colleagues prospectively evaluated 451 consecutive outpatient colonoscopies performed by one experienced endoscopist. Patients were separated into two groups: those receiving colonoscopy with (224 participants) or without (227 ) an AOB attached to the abdomen.

The researchers found that in the with an AOB attached, cecal intubation time and cecal intubation length of the colonoscope were significantly lower than in the group without an AOB. The patients in this group also had significantly fewer position changes and manual pressure as well as significantly less patient-reported abdominal distension.

"During colonoscopy, the application of an abdominal obstetric binder provided a significantly faster and more effective insertion," the authors write.

Explore further: Nurses can perform colonoscopies as well as docs

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Nurses can perform colonoscopies as well as docs

March 4, 2014
(HealthDay)—Colonoscopy quality and safety are comparable for nurse and physician endoscopy trainees, according to a study published in the March issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

Changing patient's position helps effectiveness of colonoscopy—especially on one side

September 10, 2015
September 10, 2015—Having patients lie on their left side while the right side of their colon is being examined can result in more polyps being found, thus increasing the effectiveness of colonoscopy for colorectal cancer ...

Monthly feedback linked to improved colonoscopy quality

September 19, 2017
(HealthDay)—Monthly feedback significantly improves colonoscopy quality measures, but quarterly feedback does not, according to a study published online Sept. 11 in Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

Fecal microbial transplant by oral capsule noninferior for CDI

November 29, 2017
(HealthDay)—For patients with recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (RCDI), fecal microbial transplantation (FMT) with oral capsules is noninferior to FMT by colonoscopy, according to a study published in the Nov. 28 ...

Recommended for you

Study ends debate over role of steroids in treating septic shock

January 19, 2018
The results from the largest ever study of septic shock could improve treatment for critically ill patients and save health systems worldwide hundreds of millions of dollars each year.

New approach could help curtail hospitalizations due to influenza infection

January 18, 2018
More than 700,000 Americans were hospitalized due to illnesses associated with the seasonal flu during the 2014-15 flu season, according to federal estimates. A radical new approach to vaccine development at UCLA may help ...

Flu may be spread just by breathing, new study shows; coughing and sneezing not required

January 18, 2018
It is easier to spread the influenza virus (flu) than previously thought, according to a new University of Maryland-led study released today. People commonly believe that they can catch the flu by exposure to droplets from ...

Zika virus damages placenta, which may explain malformed babies

January 18, 2018
Though the Zika virus is widely known for a recent outbreak that caused children to be born with microencephaly, or having a small head, and other malformations, scientists have struggled to explain how the virus affects ...

Certain flu virus mutations may compensate for fitness costs of other mutations

January 18, 2018
Seasonal flu viruses continually undergo mutations that help them evade the human immune system, but some of these mutations can reduce a virus's potency. According to new research published in PLOS Pathogens, certain mutations ...

Study reveals how MRSA infection compromises lymphatic function

January 17, 2018
Infections of the skin or other soft tissues with the hard-to-treat MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) bacteria appear to permanently compromise the lymphatic system, which is crucial to immune system function. ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.