AI application for treatment of gestational diabetes

March 8, 2018, Aalto University
AI application for treatment of gestational diabetes
Credit: Aalto University

AI allows individualized predictions for expectant mothers and newborn children. The aim of the individual recommendations is a positive experience for the user combined with activity that is beneficial for the glucose level.

About 52,000 women give birth in Finland every year, and 18 per cent of them – nearly 10,000 – are diagnosed with gestational . Of these, roughly half develop type 2 diabetes later on.

CleverHealth Network, an ecosystem coordinated by the Hospital District of Helsinki and Uusimaa (HUS), is now launching its first development with funding granted by Business Finland. The main partners in the gestational diabetes project are HUS, Aalto University, the University of Helsinki, Elisa and Fujitsu.

The project aims to improve the treatment and monitoring of by developing a mobile application for measuring the mother's , physical activity, nutrition, pulse and daily weight and storing it in the cloud in real time.

"By improving lifestyle during pregnancy, we can probably reduce the number of mothers who will develop type 2 diabetes as well as the risks to the child, thereby also improving the health of future generations. The application will help the patient to learn how her diet, activity and sleep affect blood levels and weight gain and, consequently, the course of the pregnancy and the newborn's health," says Saila Koivusalo, research director of the project and specialist in obstetrics and gynaecology.

The application will forward the lifestyle and glucose data in to health care personnel, who can provide guidance and support as needed.

The project will make use of machine learning to provide guidance and treatment that are in line with the patient's risk profile and meet her individual needs. Artificial intelligence also makes it possible to draw up predictions of both the mother's and the child's future health.

"The aim is to keep the glucose level low, and we are modelling both forecasts and recommendations with this in mind. The individual forecasts indicate what happens to the glucose level if an expectant mother goes for a walk, for instance. The recommendations also take individuality into consideration. The aim is a positive experience for the user combined with activity that is beneficial for the glucose level," says Academy Research Fellow Pekka Marttinen of Aalto University.

Explore further: Better monitoring needed for pregnant women with diabetes

Related Stories

Better monitoring needed for pregnant women with diabetes

November 14, 2017
Half the babies born to women with diabetes are at risk of suffering complications due to fluctuations in their mothers' glucose levels, say researchers.

No clear threshold to diagnose and treat diabetes during pregnancy

September 13, 2016
A study published by The BMJ today finds a consistent association between higher blood glucose (sugar) levels during pregnancy and increased risk of complications around the time of birth, but there is no clear evidence of ...

Weight gain between pregnancies linked to increased risk of gestational diabetes

August 1, 2017
The risk of developing gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) increases with increased weight gain between pregnancies, according to a new study published in PLOS Medicine by Linn Sorbye of the University of Bergen, Norway, ...

Healthy glucose levels the key to a healthy ageing brain

August 30, 2017
New research has found blood glucose levels even at the normal range can have a significant impact on brain atrophy in ageing.

Healthy diet could decrease gestational diabetes risk for South Asian women

August 10, 2017
South Asian women in Ontario are at high risk for gestational diabetes, but a change in diet and pre-pregnancy weight could make a significant difference, according to a new study from McMaster University.

Moderate exercise helps prevent gestational diabetes and reduce weight gain during pregnancy

June 4, 2015
Women who exercise during pregnancy are less likely to have gestational diabetes, and the exercise also helps to reduce maternal weight gain, finds a study published on 3 June 2015 in BJOG: an International Journal of Obstetrics ...

Recommended for you

Genomic study brings us closer to precision medicine for type 2 diabetes

September 21, 2018
Most patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes are treated with a "one-size-fits-all" protocol that is not tailored to each person's physiology and may leave many cases inadequately managed. A new study by scientists at the ...

High gluten diet in pregnancy linked to increased risk of diabetes in children

September 19, 2018
A high gluten intake by mothers during pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of their child developing type 1 diabetes, suggests a study published by The BMJ today.

Anti-inflammatory protein promotes healthy gut bacteria to curb obesity

September 19, 2018
Scientists from the UNC School of Medicine discovered that the anti-inflammatory protein NLRP12 normally helps protect mice against obesity and insulin resistance when they are fed a high-fat diet. The researchers also reported ...

Study reveals the current rates of diagnosed type 1 and type 2 diabetes in American adults

September 18, 2018
A new study from the University of Iowa finds that type 2 diabetes remains overwhelmingly the most common type of diabetes diagnosed in American adults who have the disease.

Research reveals link between immunity, diabetes

September 14, 2018
When it comes to diet-induced obesity, your immune system is not always your friend.

BPA exposure in U.S.-approved levels may alter insulin response in non-diabetic adults

September 14, 2018
In a first study of its kind study, researchers have found that a common chemical consumers are exposed to several times a day may be altering insulin release. Results of the study, led by scientists at the University of ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.