Higher positive cardiomyopathy genetic detection rates for whites

March 5, 2018

(HealthDay)—Compared with underrepresented minorities, white individuals have significantly higher positive detection rates and lower rates of inconclusive results on cardiomyopathy genetic testing, according to a study published online Feb. 28 in JAMA Cardiology.

Latrice G. Landry, Ph.D., from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in Silver Spring, Md., and Heidi L. Rehm, Ph.D., from Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, conducted a cross-sectional analysis of the genetic panel results for 5,729 probands with a suspected diagnosis or family history of cardiomyopathy who had been referred for testing. The results were stratified into three categories: white (79.2 percent), Asian (6.1 percent), and underrepresented minorities (14.7 percent).

The researchers found that positive detection occurred in 29 percent of white individuals compared with 18.4 and 25 percent of underrepresented minorities and Asians, respectively (P < 0.001 and P = 0.12, respectively). Inconclusive results were seen in 24.6 percent of whites compared with 39.8 and 39.2 percent of underrepresented minorities and Asians, respectively (both P < 0.001).

"This clear disparity warrants further study to understand the gaps in usefulness, which may derive from a lack of clinical testing and research in underrepresented minority populations, in the hopes of improving genetic testing outcomes for in nonwhite groups," the authors write.

Explore further: MACE risk similar for white men, women, minorities after PCI

More information: Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

MACE risk similar for white men, women, minorities after PCI

October 19, 2017
(HealthDay)—Women and minorities undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with everolimus-eluting stents have a risk of major adverse cardiac events (MACE) that is similar to that of white men, according to a ...

Genetics should inform care in noncompaction cardiomyopathy

February 14, 2018
(HealthDay)—Genetic stratification should play a role in clinical care of patients with noncompaction cardiomyopathy (NCCM), according to a study published in the Feb. 20 issue of the Journal of the American College of ...

Results from the PLATINUM DIVERSITY study presented

November 1, 2016
A dedicated stent study conducted exclusively in women and minority patients evaluated clinical outcomes within the era of contemporary PCI, comparing these results to a parallel cohort of white male patients. Although there ...

Greater racial, ethnic diversity of doctors found in Ob-Gyn

December 16, 2015
(HealthDay)—Among adult medical specialists, greater racial and ethnic diversity is found among obstetrician-gynecologists (ob-gyns), according to research published in the January issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Why are minorities underrepresented in genetic cancer studies?

November 16, 2017
Socio-cultural and clinical factors as well as healthcare processes were important drivers of a woman's willingness to provide saliva specimens for future cancer research. This is according to Vanessa B. Sheppard of Virginia ...

Racial minorities less likely to see a doctor for psoriasis

December 13, 2017
Despite the fact that their disease may be more severe, a new study shows minorities are less likely than white Americans to see a doctor for psoriasis treatment. Researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University ...

Recommended for you

New cellular pathway helps explain how inflammation leads to artery disease

June 21, 2018
Investigators have identified a new cellular pathway that may help explain how arterial inflammation develops into atherosclerosis—deposits of cholesterol, fats and other substances that create plaque, clog arteries and ...

'Smart stent' detects narrowing of arteries

June 19, 2018
For every three individuals who have had a stent implanted to keep clogged arteries open and prevent a heart attack, at least one will experience restenosis—the renewed narrowing of the artery due to plaque buildup or scarring—which ...

Marriage may protect against heart disease / stroke and associated risk of death

June 18, 2018
Marriage may protect against the development of heart disease/stroke as well as influencing who is more likely to die of it, suggests a pooled analysis of the available data, published online in the journal Heart.

Deaths from cardiac arrest are misclassified, overestimated

June 18, 2018
Forty percent of deaths attributed to cardiac arrest are not sudden or unexpected, and nearly half of the remainder are not arrhythmic—the only situation in which CPR and defibrillators are effective—according to an analysis ...

Tick-borne meat sensitivity linked to heart disease

June 15, 2018
University of Virginia School of Medicine researchers have linked sensitivity to an allergen in red meat—a sensitivity spread by tick bites—with a buildup of fatty plaque in the arteries of the heart. This buildup may ...

Tobacco aside, e-cigarette flavorings may harm blood vessels

June 14, 2018
Flavor additives used in electronic cigarettes and related tobacco products could impair blood vessel function and may be an early indicator of heart damage, according to new laboratory research in Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.