Factors ID'd for breastfeeding behavior in women with BMI >30

April 6, 2018

(HealthDay)—Five psychological factors are associated with breastfeeding behaviors among women with a body mass index ≥30 kg/m², according to a review published online March 24 in Obesity Reviews.

Stephanie Lyons, from the University of Manchester in the United Kingdom, and colleagues examined the correlation between any psychological factor and breastfeeding behavior among women with a of ≥30 kg/m². Twenty eligible papers were identified and included in the analysis.

The researchers identified 16 in the papers. Five factors correlated with breastfeeding behaviors: intentions to breastfeed; belief in the nutritional adequacy and sufficiency of breast milk; belief about others' infant feeding preferences; body image; and . Current care should encourage women to plan to breastfeed, provide corrective information for specific beliefs, and address issues relating to body image and social knowledge.

"Recommendations for future research include further exploration of several psychological factors (i.e., expecting that breastfeeding will enhance weight loss, depression, anxiety, and stress) and evidence and theory-based intervention development," the authors write.

Explore further: Research reveals why obese mothers less likely to breastfeed

More information: Abstract/Full Text

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