Scientists find possible autism biomarker in cerebrospinal fluid

May 2, 2018, Stanford University Medical Center
Rhesus macaques live in large family groups, but a few animals consistently show less social interaction than others. New research at the California National Primate Research Center at UC Davis and Stanford University shows that these 'low social' animals have low levels of the hormone vasopressin in cerebrospinal fluid. A similar result was seen in a small group of children with autism. Credit: K. West, CNPRC

Autism diagnosis is slow and cumbersome, but new findings linking a hormone called vasopressin to social behavior in monkeys and autism in people may change that. Low vasopressin in cerebrospinal fluid was related to less sociability in both species, indicating the hormone may be a biomarker for autism.

A paper describing the research, which was led by scientists at the Stanford University School of Medicine and the University of California-Davis, will be published May 2 in Science Translational Medicine.

"Since autism affects the brain, it's really hard to access the biology of the condition to know what might be altered," said Karen Parker, PhD, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Stanford and the lead author of the new study. "Right now, the diagnosis is based on parents' reports of their children's symptoms, and on clinicians observing children in the clinic."

The study's senior author is John Capitanio, PhD, professor of psychology at UC-Davis.

Autism, a developmental disorder characterized by impaired social abilities, affects 1 in 68 U.S. children. Research has shown that early, intensive behavioral treatment is beneficial. Yet many children don't receive a timely diagnosis. A biological test, with a specific lab measurement indicating autism, could make diagnosis faster.

Difficult condition to study

Not only is the biology of autism difficult to study in people, but many research animals are unsuited to autism research, Parker said. For instance, mice often fail to show behavioral changes in response to gene mutations that cause autism in people.

So the researchers looked for autism biomarkers in rhesus , a species whose social capabilities are closer to those of humans. The monkeys had been raised by their mothers in social groups in a primate research colony at UC-Davis. From 222 male animals, the scientists selected 15 with naturally low sociability and compared them with 15 monkeys with naturally high sociability on several biological parameters.

The scientists measured levels of two hormones, oxytocin and vasopressin, in the monkeys' blood and in their , which bathes the brain. Both hormones are peptides implicated in a variety of social roles, including parental care and bonds between mates. Some prior studies have hinted that these hormones may also be involved in autism.

Monkeys in the less social group had significantly less vasopressin in their cerebrospinal fluid than monkeys in the more social group. These vasopressin levels accurately predicted the frequency with which individual monkeys participated in social grooming, an important social activity for . Vasopressin levels in blood were not different between the two groups. In a second group of 10 monkeys, whose cerebrospinal fluid was sampled four times over four months, the scientists showed that vasopressin levels in the fluid were stable over time.

The researchers also compared vasopressin levels in 14 boys with autism and seven age-matched children without autism. (Vasopressin levels were tested in the children's cerebrospinal fluid, which was collected via lumbar puncture for medical reasons; their families agreed to allow some fluid to be used for research.) Children with autism had lower vasopressin levels than children without autism, the study found.

"What we consider this to be at this point is a biomarker for low sociability," Capitanio said.

The researchers now want to test a larger group of monkeys for vasopressin levels to determine whether the hormone levels can distinguish monkeys with low social abilities from others with a wide range of social ability. And they want to explore whether low vasopressin could be detected before symptoms of impaired social ability emerge.

"We don't know if we see really low cerebrospinal fluid before you see behavioral symptoms of ," Parker said. "Ideally, it would be a risk marker, but we haven't studied that yet."

Explore further: Low levels of hormone linked to social deficit in autism, study finds

More information: K.J. Parker el al., "Arginine vasopressin in cerebrospinal fluid is a marker of sociality in nonhuman primates," Science Translational Medicine (2018). stm.sciencemag.org/lookup/doi/ … scitranslmed.aam9100

Related Stories

Low levels of hormone linked to social deficit in autism, study finds

July 22, 2015
A brain-chemistry deficit in children with autism may help to explain their social difficulties, according to new findings from the Stanford University School of Medicine.

Can one model the social deficits of autism and schizophrenia in animals?

May 5, 2011
5 May 2011 - The use of animal models to study human disease is essential to help advance our understanding of disease and to develop new therapeutic treatments.

Blood-oxytocin levels in normal range in children with autism

August 4, 2014
Autism does not appear to be solely caused by a deficiency of oxytocin, but the hormone's universal ability to boost social function may prove useful in treating a subset of children with the developmental disorder, according ...

Oxytocin improves social abilities in some kids with autism, study finds

July 10, 2017
Children with autism showed improved social behavior when treated with oxytocin, a hormone linked to social abilities, according to a new study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. Children with low ...

Oxytocin levels in blood, cerebrospinal fluid are linked, study finds

November 4, 2014
For years, scientists have debated how best to assess brain levels of oxytocin, a hormone implicated in social behaviors. Now, researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have found the first direct evidence ...

Recommended for you

Latest research hints at predicting autism risk for pregnant mothers

September 21, 2018
Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute—led by Juergen Hahn, professor and head of biomedical engineering—are continuing to make remarkable progress with their research focused on autism spectrum disorder (ASD). ...

Scientists reveal drumming helps schoolchildren diagnosed with autism

September 14, 2018
Drumming for 60 minutes a week can benefit children diagnosed with autism and supports learning at school, according to a new scientific study.

Overlapping copy number variations underlie autism and schizophrenia in Japanese patients

September 11, 2018
Common genetic variants may underlie autism spectrum disorder and schizophrenia across human populations, according to a study appearing September 11th in the journal Cell Reports. In line with previous studies in Caucasians, ...

New biomarker panel could accelerate autism diagnoses

September 6, 2018
Investigators at the UC Davis MIND Institute and NeuroPointDX, a division of Stemina Biomarker Discovery, have identified a group of blood metabolites that could help detect some children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). ...

Depression strikes nearly one in five young adults with autism: study

August 31, 2018
(HealthDay)—Depression affects almost 20 percent of young adults with autism, new research shows, a rate that's more than triple that seen in the general population.

Kids with autism learn, grow with the 'social robot'

August 22, 2018
Robots may hold the keys to social success for kids with autism.

1 comment

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

LaPortaMA
not rated yet May 02, 2018
That's a very odd thing given that consensus has been that vasopressin is considered a marker for closeness and familiarity.

You do realize, of course, that the odds are that this is wrong. Time will tell.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.