Novel approach to making therapeutic proteins at point of care

July 10, 2018, University of Maryland Baltimore County

A team of researchers led by UMBC have developed a novel approach to making therapeutic proteins available at the point of care.

This technology is unique because it ensures that medicines are available anywhere in the world, including remote locations, combat zones, and places impacted by .

A new paper in Nature Biomedical Engineering explains how this approach will enable faster drug development because of the portable system that is about the size of a suitcase.

The medicines are able to be developed without relying on manufacturing facilities or requiring transport, which is crucial when time is of the essence.

This work not only allows for medicine to be available even when resources are limited, but also responds to demands.

In the paper, the researchers explain that this approach allows for more personalized medicines to be created, addressing patients' needs and limiting .

Explore further: Researchers report novel method to quickly make therapeutic proteins from human blood

More information: Rajani Adiga et al, Point-of-care production of therapeutic proteins of good-manufacturing-practice quality, Nature Biomedical Engineering (2018). DOI: 10.1038/s41551-018-0259-1

Related Stories

Researchers report novel method to quickly make therapeutic proteins from human blood

June 22, 2018
UMBC researchers report novel method to quickly make therapeutic proteins from human blood

AMA: docs declare drug shortages public health emergency

June 26, 2018
(HealthDay)—At the annual meeting of the American Medical Association (AMA), physicians adopted policy declaring drug shortages an urgent public health crisis.

Canada needs essential medicines list to ensure supply

June 13, 2016
Canada needs to create a list of essential medicines to help protect against drug shortages, argues an analysis in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal)

FDA: Drug shortages possible due to Puerto Rico power outage

October 7, 2017
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration says drug shortages are possible because of expected long-term power outages in Puerto Rico.

Quality cancer care—not just a matter of anti-cancer medicines

April 26, 2018
ESMO, the leading professional organisation for medical oncology, shares concerns expressed in a scientific paper and reflected in the international media about the rising costs of cancer medicines.

Recommended for you

Fetal gene therapy prevents fatal neurodegenerative disease

July 16, 2018
A fatal neurodegenerative condition known as Gaucher disease can be prevented in mice following fetal gene therapy, finds a new study led by UCL, the KK Women's and Children's Hospital and National University Health System ...

New study finds that fat consumption is the only cause of weight gain

July 13, 2018
Scientists from the University of Aberdeen and the Chinese Academy of Sciences have undertaken the largest study of its kind looking at what components of diet—fat, carbohydrates or protein—caused mice to gain weight.

Basic research in fruit flies leads to potential drug for diseases afflicting millions

July 13, 2018
River blindness and elephantiasis are debilitating diseases caused by parasitic worms that infect as many as 150 million people worldwide. They are among the "neglected tropical diseases" for which better treatments are desperately ...

Light based cochlear implant restores hearing in gerbils

July 12, 2018
A team of researchers with members from a variety of institutions across Germany has developed a new type of cochlear implant—one based on light. In their paper published in the journal Science Translational Medicine, the ...

Researchers discover gene that controls bone-to-fat ratio in bone marrow

July 12, 2018
In an unexpected discovery, UCLA researchers have found that a gene previously known to control human metabolism also controls the equilibrium of bone and fat in bone marrow as well as how an adult stem cell expresses its ...

Intensive care patients' muscles unable to use fats for energy

July 12, 2018
The muscles of people in intensive care are less able to use fats for energy, contributing to extensive loss of muscle mass, finds a new study co-led by UCL, King's College London and Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.