Novel approach to making therapeutic proteins at point of care

July 10, 2018, University of Maryland Baltimore County

A team of researchers led by UMBC have developed a novel approach to making therapeutic proteins available at the point of care.

This technology is unique because it ensures that medicines are available anywhere in the world, including remote locations, combat zones, and places impacted by .

A new paper in Nature Biomedical Engineering explains how this approach will enable faster drug development because of the portable system that is about the size of a suitcase.

The medicines are able to be developed without relying on manufacturing facilities or requiring transport, which is crucial when time is of the essence.

This work not only allows for medicine to be available even when resources are limited, but also responds to demands.

In the paper, the researchers explain that this approach allows for more personalized medicines to be created, addressing patients' needs and limiting .

Explore further: Researchers report novel method to quickly make therapeutic proteins from human blood

More information: Rajani Adiga et al, Point-of-care production of therapeutic proteins of good-manufacturing-practice quality, Nature Biomedical Engineering (2018). DOI: 10.1038/s41551-018-0259-1

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