Critics demand stop to 'Guinea pig' sepsis clinical trial

September 26, 2018

(HealthDay)—A major non-profit advocacy group is asking that a large government trial comparing treatments for sepsis be shut down.

The trial, called Clovers, "places seriously ill patients at risk without the possibility of gaining information that can provide benefits either to the subjects or to future patients," according to an analysis of the trial by investigators at the U.S. National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, Md. And in a letter sent to the federal Office for Human Research Protection, Public Citizen compared the study to "an experiment that would be conducted on laboratory animals," The New York Times reported.

"The human subjects of the Clovers trial, as designed and currently conducted, are unwitting guinea pigs in a physiology experiment," Public Citizens' Michael Carome, M.D., and Sidney Wolfe, M.D., wrote in their letter. The Clovers trial began in March and is funded by the NIH. It is moving forward and hopes to enroll 2,320 patients from 44 hospitals nationwide.

The Clovers trial seeks to determine which one of two therapeutic options—limiting fluids and starting vasopressors, or adding and holding off on drug therapy—works best to curb .

Explore further: Clinical trial fails to disclose risk of death, repeat heart attacks, advocacy group says

More information: The New York Times Article
Clovers Clinical Trial

Related Stories

Clinical trial fails to disclose risk of death, repeat heart attacks, advocacy group says

August 2, 2017
A clinical trial testing blood transfusion therapies for heart attack patients may place participants in danger of death or a repeat heart attack without fully disclosing those risks, a Washington, D.C.-based consumer advocacy ...

Most parents willing to enroll child in food allergen trials

April 4, 2018
(HealthDay)—The majority of caregivers of children with food allergy are willing to consider participation in clinical trials for food allergy immunotherapy, according to a research letter published in the March issue of ...

Patients' genes could hold the clue to reducing severe sepsis

August 1, 2016
Patients' genes could unlock urgently needed new treatments for severe sepsis, which kills three and a half times as many Australians as the road toll.

That four-leaf clover you found may not be a four-leaf clover

June 4, 2013
(Phys.org) —Are four-leaf clovers becoming more common? That was the question put to me by a reader recently. Apparently her kids are finding four-leaf clovers on a daily basis as they walk home from school. What gives?

Early identification and treatment of septic shock to save lives

June 1, 2012
(Medical Xpress) -- Recognition of severe septic shock early and starting a patient on an effective antibiotic treatment immediately is critical to saving lives, according to an editorial by two Virginia Commonwealth University ...

University was tipped off to possible unauthorized trials of herpes vaccine

December 5, 2017
The university that employed a controversial herpes vaccine researcher has told the federal government it learned last summer of the possibility of his illegal experimentation on human subjects. But Southern Illinois University ...

Recommended for you

Researchers cure drug-resistant infections without antibiotics

October 17, 2018
Biochemists, microbiologists, drug discovery experts and infectious disease doctors have teamed up in a new study that shows antibiotics are not always necessary to cure sepsis in mice. Instead of killing causative bacteria ...

How drug resistant TB evolved and spread globally

October 17, 2018
The most common form of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB) originated in Europe and spread to Asia, Africa and the Americas with European explorers and colonialists, reveals a new study led by UCL and the Norwegian Institute ...

Infectious disease consultation significantly reduces mortality of patients with bloodstream yeast infections

October 17, 2018
In a retrospective cohort study conducted at the University of Alabama at Birmingham Division of Infectious Diseases, patients with candidemia—a yeast infection in the bloodstream—had more positive outcomes as they relate ...

Marker may help target treatments for Crohn's patients

October 16, 2018
Crohn's disease (CD), a chronic inflammatory condition of the intestinal tract, has emerged as a global disease, with rates steadily increasing over the last 50 years. Experts have long suspected that CD likely represents ...

Study traces hospital-acquired bloodstream infections to patients' own bodies

October 15, 2018
The most common source of a bloodstream infection acquired during a hospital stay is not a nurse's or doctor's dirty hands, or another patient's sneeze or visitor's cough, but the patient's own gut, Stanford University School ...

Polio: Environmental monitoring will be key as world reaches global eradication

October 15, 2018
Robust environmental monitoring should be used as the world approaches global eradication of polio, say University of Michigan researchers who recently studied the epidemiology of the 2013 silent polio outbreak in Rahat, ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.