Families shape learning difficulties research

September 12, 2018, University of Edinburgh
Credit: CC0 Public Domain

Young people with learning difficulties and their families have helped to identify key areas of research that could improve their lives.

Ten research priorities – which include devising approaches to tackle bullying and creating the best learning environments – will be used to inform new research initiatives at the University of Edinburgh and worldwide.

The list is the result of a consultation to better understand the needs of people living with learning difficulties and professionals who support them.

Dyslexia and autism

Estimates suggest as many as one in five children in Scotland has a learning difficulty, which are often linked to conditions such as dyslexia, ADHD and .

Tests to spot early signs of difficulties and identify the best ways that professionals can support families were highlighted as key goals in the consultation.

Consultation

More than 700 responses were received from across Scotland during the consultation, which was promoted by charities, professional organisations and on social media.

The project was led by The Salvesen Mindroom Centre and the University of Edinburgh in partnership with the James Lind Alliance, a non-profit organisation that helps set research priorities.

"It is vital that people with learning difficulties are given a voice and are involved in research design from the outset. We are delighted to now have clear priorities for our research going forward and are hopeful that the project will lead to improvements in diagnosis and support," says Professor Anne O'Hare.

"Today's launch is an exciting step towards ensuring that every person with a learning difficulty in Scotland receives the recognition and the support they need to achieve their potential. We look forward to working alongside the University of Edinburgh and wider research community to make that happen," says Christine Carlin, Chief executive of the Salvesen Mindroom Centre

"It is so good that have had as much of a voice in setting the top 10 as parents and professionals. Kids, as much as adults, know what is important when you have a learning difficulty," says Sam McGovern,Dyslexia Scotland Ambassador

Explore further: Patients to set agenda for heart failure research

Related Stories

Patients to set agenda for heart failure research

June 14, 2018
People with advanced heart failure, their carers, families and friends are being asked to help set the priorities for future research into the condition. Researchers from the Universities of Bristol, Oxford and Cambridge ...

Why US policies for dyslexia should be scrapped

March 5, 2018
Many of the current US Federal and State dyslexia laws should be scrapped as they ignore scientific evidence and privilege some poor readers at the expense of huge numbers of others, according to a leading expert in reading ...

New guidance improves support for parents with learning disabilities

October 6, 2016
Updated advice on how to work with parents who have learning difficulties has been issued by the Working Together with Parents Network (WPTN), led by the University of Bristol.

DNA tests have potential to transform next 70 years of NHS care, experts say

July 9, 2018
Patients in Scotland could benefit from a revolution in personalised healthcare, thanks to major investments in gene sequencing technology.

Analysing the way children sleep could help us to understand autism

March 28, 2017
On average, humans spend roughly a third of their lives asleep. This might sound like quite a long time, but sleep has been shown to be vital for "normal" human functioning. Without enough sleep, things go downhill for most ...

Pilot programme helps new mums with learning difficulties

January 14, 2016
New mothers with learning difficulties have benefitted from a pilot programme that helped them learn to care for and interact with their babies, an evaluation by University of Bristol experts has found.

Recommended for you

College students choose smartphones over food

November 16, 2018
University at Buffalo researchers have found that college students prefer food deprivation over smartphone deprivation, according to results from a paper in Addictive Behaviors.

Social media is affecting the way we view our bodies—and not in a good way

November 15, 2018
Young women who actively engage with social media images of friends who they think are more attractive than themselves report feeling worse about their own appearance afterward, a York University study shows.

Study finds mindfulness apps can improve mental health

November 15, 2018
A University of Otago study has found that using mindfulness meditation applications (apps) on phones is associated with improvements in people's mental health.

New research has revealed we are actually better at remembering names than faces

November 14, 2018
With the Christmas party season fast approaching, there will be plenty of opportunity to re-live the familiar, and excruciatingly-awkward, social situation of not being able to remember an acquaintance's name.

Older adults' abstract reasoning ability predicts depressive symptoms over time

November 14, 2018
Age-related declines in abstract reasoning ability predict increasing depressive symptoms in subsequent years, according to data from a longitudinal study of older adults in Scotland. The research is published in Psychological ...

The illusion of multitasking boosts performance

November 13, 2018
Our ability to do things well suffers when we try to complete several tasks at once, but a series of experiments suggests that merely believing that we're multitasking may boost our performance by making us more engaged in ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.