Patrons of 'vampire facial' spa may have been exposed to HIV

September 15, 2018

(HealthDay)—Customers of an Albuquerque spa who received a "vampire facial" are being warned that they may have been exposed to HIV, hepatitis B and hepatitis C through human blood used in the controversial procedure.

In a vampire facial—popularized by Kim Kardashian and other celebrities—a patient's blood is drawn and then injected back into the face using micro-needles. But the New Mexico Department of Health says an inspection at the VIP Spa in Albuquerque detected practices that might spread HIV or hepatitis B and C, CBS News reported.

"We undertook the inspection because a client of the VIP Spa developed an infection that may have resulted from a procedure performed at the spa," state epidemiologist Michael Landen, M.D., told CBS.

His agency is urging that anyone who received a vampire facial at the spa get tested as soon as possible, especially if the procedure happened in May or June. Testing would be free and confidential, they added.

Explore further: NFID initiative working to up hepatitis B vaccination rates

More information: CBS News Article

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