Adenosine kinase deficiency makes liver more susceptible to carcinogen

Adenosine kinase deficiency makes liver more susceptible to carcinogen
Credit: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers

A new study has shown that reduced adenosine kinase expression (ADK) in the liver can make it more susceptible to carcinogenic damage and the development of liver cancer. Combined results from the study of human liver cancer samples and mice with reduced levels of ADK expression support these findings, reported in Journal of Caffeine and Adenosine Research.

In the article entitled "Adenosine Kinase Deficiency Increases Susceptibility to a Carcinogen," Rkia El-Kharrag, Ph.D., Randy Owen, BSc, and Detlev Boison, Ph.D., Legacy Research Institute, Portland, OR, showed that 64% of patients with liver cancer had lower ADK expression. ADK is highly expressed in the , where it regulates adenosine levels and is important in controlling hepatic metabolism. The researchers used transgenic technology to generate mice with reduced ADK expression and then exposed them to a carcinogen to study the effects on the animals' and survival.

"These results might represent a very significant advance in the field. Further studies should confirm if adenosine kinase represents a new biomarker or a pharmacological target in ," says Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Caffeine and Adenosine Research Sergi Ferré, MD, Ph.D., and his research colleagues in the Integrative Neurobiology Section, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, Baltimore, MD.


Explore further

Is adenosine the missing link in restless leg syndrome?

More information: Rkia El-Kharrag et al, Adenosine Kinase Deficiency Increases Susceptibility to a Carcinogen, Journal of Caffeine and Adenosine Research (2019). DOI: 10.1089/caff.2018.0019
Citation: Adenosine kinase deficiency makes liver more susceptible to carcinogen (2019, April 10) retrieved 16 October 2019 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2019-04-adenosine-kinase-deficiency-liver-susceptible.html
This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.
1 shares

Feedback to editors

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more