Impact of metabolic syndrome on severity of COVID-19 illness

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Patients with metabolic syndrome have significantly worse hospitalization and mortality rates due to COVID-19. Hypertension, diabetes, and obesity are common comorbidities associated with metabolic syndrome, as described in a new study published in the peer-reviewed journal Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders.

"Our results demonstrate that patients with metabolic syndrome were 77% more likely to be hospitalized, 56% more likely to be admitted to the intensive care unit, and 81% more likely to die from COVID-19, according to Sangeeta Kashyap, MD, from the Cleveland Clinic, and coauthors. "Obesity, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, and are modifiable components of metabolic syndrome that would reduce morbidity and mortality of COVID-19," conclude the investigators.

"This paper is a timely reminder of the need to appreciate individual risk factors when assessing outcomes of COVID-19—and that obesity is probably the most important (and modifiable) risk factor that explains the increase in risk. For example, the presence of metabolic syndrome doubled the death rate from 3% to 6%. Half of all patients with metabolic syndrome were hospitalized—in contrast to 25% of those without metabolic syndrome," says Dr. Adrian Vella, Editor-in-Chief of Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders and Professor, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN.


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More information: Shannon Wu et al, Impact of Metabolic Syndrome on Severity of COVID-19 Illness, Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders (2022). DOI: 10.1089/met.2021.0102
Citation: Impact of metabolic syndrome on severity of COVID-19 illness (2022, January 11) retrieved 19 May 2022 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2022-01-impact-metabolic-syndrome-severity-covid-.html
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