American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB) is a learned society that was founded on December 26, 1906 at a meeting organized by John Jacob Abel (Johns Hopkins University). The roots of the society were in the American Physiological Society, which had been formed some 20 years earlier. The ASBMB was originally called the American Society of Biological Chemists, before obtaining its current name in 1987. The society is based in Rockville, Maryland. ASBMB's mission is to advance the science of biochemistry and molecular biology through publication of scientific and educational journals, the organization of scientific meetings, advocacy for funding of basic research and education, support of science education at all levels, and by promoting the diversity of individuals entering the scientific workforce. The organization currently has over 12,000 members.

Website
http://www.asbmb.org/
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Society_for_Biochemistry_and_Molecular_Biology

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