Medical research

Going to 'Wars' against cancer and heart disease

In a study conducted by Duke-NUS Medical School (Duke-NUS) and the National Heart Centre Singapore (NHCS), researchers discovered a new gene that controls blood vessel formation. This work presents a possible new drug target ...

Oncology & Cancer

Hybrid cells cause chaos around cancers

Rice University researchers have built a simulation to show how cancerous tumors manipulate blood-vessel growth for their own benefit.

Oncology & Cancer

Researchers generate immunity against tumor vessel protein

Sometimes a full-on assault isn't the best approach when dealing with a powerful enemy. A more effective approach, in the long run, may be to target the support system replenishing the supplies that keep your foe strong and ...

Oncology & Cancer

Some stem cells can trigger tumors

(Medical Xpress) -- Stem cells often used in reconstructive surgery following mastectomies and other cancer-removal treatments may pose a danger: Cornell biomedical scientists have discovered that these cells, in contact ...

Oncology & Cancer

Morphine blocks tumor growth

Current research suggests that taking morphine can block new blood vessel and tumor growth. The related report by Koodie et al, "Morphine suppresses tumor angiogenesis through a HIF1α/p38MAPK pathway," appears in the ...

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Angiogenesis

Angiogenesis is the physiological process involving the growth of new blood vessels from pre-existing vessels. Though there has been some debate over terminology, vasculogenesis is the term used for spontaneous blood-vessel formation, and intussusception is the term for the formation of new blood vessels by the splitting of exisiting ones.

Angiogenesis is a normal and vital process in growth and development, as well as in wound healing and in granulation tissue. However, it is also a fundamental step in the transition of tumors from a dormant state to a malignant one, leading to the use of angiogenesis inhibitors. The identification of an angiogenic diffusible factor derived from tumors was made initially by Greenblatt and Shubik in 1968.

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