Endocrinology & Metabolism

Mice without a functional internal clock have inflexible breathing

New research suggests that the molecular clock, derived from time-keeping genes in our cells, enables us to modify how we breathe over the day. Researchers from Marquette University in Wisconsin determined that mice without ...

Obstetrics & gynaecology

New research sheds light on how shift work may influence fertility

Only four weeks of shift work-like patterns in female mice are enough to disrupt their biological clock and reduce fertility, according to research presented at the 25th European Congress of Endocrinology. The findings help ...

Health

How is sleep affected by changing clocks and seasons?

How are you sleeping? A new study has found the transition from daylight saving time to standard time, when one hour is gained overnight, was associated with a brief increase in sleep disorders such as difficulty going to ...

Health

How does the body clock keep track of time?

Picture the scene: you wake up in the dim light of the morning, and wonder if it's already time to get up. Just as you reach for your bedside clock, your morning alarm goes off. It's a handy—if mysterious—skill. But how ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Seven tips for a healthier relationship with your phone

How long do you spend staring at a screen every day? According to one report, the average person spends about seven hours a day on screens connected to the internet. And that figure is going to be even higher if your job ...

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Clock

A clock is an instrument used to indicate, keep, and co-ordinate time. The word clock is derived ultimately (via Dutch, Northern French, and Medieval Latin) from the Celtic words clagan and clocca meaning "bell". A silent instrument missing such a mechanism has traditionally been known as a timepiece. In general usage today a "clock" refers to any device for measuring and displaying the time. Watches and other timepieces that can be carried on one's person are often distinguished from clocks.

The clock is one of the oldest human inventions, meeting the need to consistently measure intervals of time shorter than the natural units: the day; the lunar month; and the year. Devices operating on several different physical processes have been used over the millennia, culminating in the clocks of today.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA