Oncology & Cancer

A new choice for young women with pre-cancerous cervical disease

A single test for women has been shown to aid in predicting which cases of precancerous cervical disease will become more serious, helping with decisions on whether or not surgery is needed, according to a study led by Queen ...

Genetics

Molecular cause for severe multi-organ syndrome

Three unrelated families on three continents (from continental Portugal, the United States and Brazil), all with healthy ancestors, had children with a very rare multi-organ condition that causes early-onset retinal degeneration, ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Adenocarcinoma, high-grade dysplasia up with barrett esophagus

(HealthDay)—The prevalence of high-grade dysplasia (HGD) and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) has significantly increased since 1995 in patients with Barrett esophagus (BE), according to a study published in the February ...

Genetics

New skeletal disease found and explained

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have discovered a new and rare skeletal disease. In a study published in the journal Nature Medicine, they describe the molecular mechanism of the disease, in which small RNA ...

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Dysplasia

Dysplasia (from the Greek δυσπλασία "malformation", δυσ- "mal-" + πλάθω "to create, to form"), is a term used in pathology to refer to an abnormality of development. This generally consists of an expansion of immature cells, with a corresponding decrease in the number and location of mature cells. Dysplasia is often indicative of an early neoplastic process. The term dysplasia is typically used when the cellular abnormality is restricted to the originating tissue, as in the case of an early, in-situ neoplasm.

Dysplasia, in which cell maturation and differentiation are delayed, can be contrasted with metaplasia, in which cells of one mature, differentiated type are replaced by cells of another mature, differentiated type.

The terms hip dysplasia and fibrous dysplasia also refer to abnormal development, but at a more macroscopic level.

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