Oncology & Cancer

AI analysis of cancer mutations may improve therapy

Cancer has many faces—no wonder, then, that the range of cancer-causing mutations is huge as well. The totality of such genomic alterations in an individual is what experts call a "mutational landscape." These landscapes ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Abnormal 12-hour cyclic gene activity found in schizophrenic brains

Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, U.S. present the first evidence of 12-hour cycles of gene activity in the human brain. Published in the open access journal PLOS Biology on January 24, the study ...

Neuroscience

Fresh insights into inflammation, aging brains

Results from a new study by Harvard researchers just published in Cell offer insights into the relationship between inflammation and the cognitive impairment we experience as we age, and suggest the possibility that it may ...

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Expressionism

Expressionism was a modernist movement, initially in poetry and painting, originating in Germany at the beginning of the 20th century. Its typical trait is to present the world solely from a subjective perspective, distorting it radically for emotional effect in order to evoke moods or ideas. Expressionist artists sought to express meaning or emotional experience rather than physical reality.

Expressionism was developed as an avant-garde style before the First World War. It remained popular during the Weimar Republic, particularly in Berlin. The style extended to a wide range of the arts, including painting, literature, theatre, dance, film, architecture and music.

The term is sometimes suggestive of emotional angst. In a general sense, painters such as Matthias Grünewald and El Greco are sometimes termed expressionist, though in practice the term is applied mainly to 20th-century works. The Expressionist emphasis on individual perspective has been characterized as a reaction to positivism and other artistic styles such as naturalism and impressionism.

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