Oncology & Cancer

Apoptosis inhibitor enables some lymphomas to resist therapy

Lymphomas are a diverse group of cancers of the immune system, which is the body's primary defense against autoimmune disease, infections, and malignancy. Now, researchers at the University of Tsukuba have clarified risk ...

Oncology & Cancer

Attacking tumors from the inside

A new technology that allows researchers to peer inside malignant tumors shows that two experimental drugs can normalize aberrant blood vessels, oxygenation, and other aspects of the tumor microenvironment in non-small cell ...

Oncology & Cancer

Adverse effects from cancer drug trials explained

A team of researchers investigating how a certain type of drugs can kill cells has discovered that these drugs can do more harm than good when used in combination with other cancer treatments.

Oncology & Cancer

New independent prognostic indicator in gastric cancer

Despite many developments in the diagnosis and treatment of gastric cancer, it continues to be an important public health problem. Therefore, besides classical methods, new biomolecules are needed to facilitate the prediction ...

Oncology & Cancer

Putting 'super' in natural killer cells

Using induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and deleting a key gene, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine have created natural killer cells—a type of immune cell—with measurably stronger ...

Medical research

A faster way to make antibody-drug conjugates

A USC School of Pharmacy-led team has engineered a new, faster way to make drugs that precisely target malignant cells—while leaving healthy tissue undamaged—that could lead the way to better treatments for numerous types ...

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Malignancy

Malignancy (from the Latin roots mal- = "bad" and -genus = "born") is the tendency of a medical condition, especially tumors to become progressively worse and to potentially result in death. It is characterized by the properties of anaplasia, invasiveness, and metastasis. Malignant is a corresponding adjectival medical term used to describe a severe and progressively worsening disease. The term is most familiar as a description of cancer. A malignant tumor may be contrasted with a non-cancerous benign tumor in that a malignancy is not self-limited in its growth, is capable of invading into adjacent tissues, and may be capable of spreading to distant tissues (metastasizing), while a benign tumor has none of those properties. Malignant tumor is synonymous with cancer. Uses of "malignant" in oncology:

Non-oncologic disorders referred to as "malignant":

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