Oncology & Cancer

T cell behavior determines which tumors respond to treatment

Immunotherapy unleashes the power of the immune system to fight cancer. However, for some patients, immunotherapy doesn't work, and new research may help explain why. When immune cells called T lymphocytes infiltrate malignant ...

Oncology & Cancer

The mechanisms behind cancer cell resistance to TRAIL treatment

Researchers at KoƧ University discovered why a promising class of cancer treatments fail, and their findings point to how such treatments might be made to work. The research revealed the mechanisms behind the development ...

Oncology & Cancer

Research suggests possibility of vaccine to prevent skin cancer

Research by the Oregon State University College of Pharmacy suggests that a vaccine stimulating production of a protein critical to the skin's antioxidant network could help people bolster their defenses against skin cancer.

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Malignancy

Malignancy (from the Latin roots mal- = "bad" and -genus = "born") is the tendency of a medical condition, especially tumors to become progressively worse and to potentially result in death. It is characterized by the properties of anaplasia, invasiveness, and metastasis. Malignant is a corresponding adjectival medical term used to describe a severe and progressively worsening disease. The term is most familiar as a description of cancer. A malignant tumor may be contrasted with a non-cancerous benign tumor in that a malignancy is not self-limited in its growth, is capable of invading into adjacent tissues, and may be capable of spreading to distant tissues (metastasizing), while a benign tumor has none of those properties. Malignant tumor is synonymous with cancer. Uses of "malignant" in oncology:

Non-oncologic disorders referred to as "malignant":

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